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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/23/17)

Bunch Carrots:

It’s important to store your bunch carrots properly to prolong their freshness. To do so, twist the green tops off when you first get your box, otherwise the greens will keep drawing up moisture and nutrients from their “root” and you’ll get a rubbery dried out carrot. Carrots are one of the easiest veggies to incorporate into a busy lifestyle. They are quick and easy to prep for snacking – just remove the tops, wash and store in the fridge – really, no peeling necessary! One thing that consumers should be aware of is the importance of buying organic carrots. Conventionally grown carrots are often a concentrated source of heavy metals, nitrates and pesticides. Eating carrots is a healthy alternative to junk food, and just one carrot can boost your willpower that is in resistance to those processed foods.

Baby Bok Choy:

This Asian vegetable is in a class all on its own. It has a delicate and almost foam like texture but can be quite versatile. Try sautéing in a little olive oil and freshly minced garlic or follow the recipe below. I recently discovered that baby bok choy has a nice flavor without being cooked at all (not sure why I didn’t try it this sooner!) Plus, it has a wonderfully crunchy texture, which I love! So, if you’re not a fan of the squishier consistency of cooked bok choy, try tossing it into a salad with other salad veggies (try using diced apple and raisons in this one!). Then top with your favorite dressing (a ginger vinaigrette works great) or try making your own! You could simply mix olive oil and vinegar with a little mustard (my go to), or try something a little fancier by blending ½ cup of soy, hemp, or almond milk, ½ cup cashews or ¼ cup cashew butter, ¼ cup balsamic vinegar, and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard.

 

How to Make an Amazing Green Salad

We’ve all had one of those amazing salads, that was so good we just had to keep shoving forkfuls into our mouths. What makes these salads so delicious? It’s the added proteins and blend of different flavors that made each of them special and tasty in their own way.

WHAT MAKES A SALAD GOOD?

  • Lots of different textures- soft, Crunchy, smooth, chewy, crisp
  • Dressing mixed well throughout
  • Fresh, tasty salad base (lettuce, Spinach, herb mix, etc.)
  • Blend of tastes- sweet, salty, savory, sour, bitter

TRY FOR A MIX OF THESE 5 BASIC ELEMENTS:

  1. Base of greens
  2. One or more other vegetables (crunchy, colorful, variety of sizes and textures)
  3. Something sweet
  4. A type of protein
  5. Dressing (either complex or simple)

Sample Salad #1

Supergreens mix (available at klesickfarms.com), cooked diced chicken (leftover from another meal), red peppers, red onions, cucumbers, feta cheese, candied or toasted walnuts, homemade balsamic vinaigrette.

Sample Salad #2

Torn leaf or romaine lettuce, black beans and chicken (which you can quickly warm up with some taco-type spices), shredded Monterey jack cheese, diced avocado, diced tomatoes, crumbled tortilla chips, red peppers, a few parsley leaves, homemade ranch dressing.

Adapted fromkeeperofthehome.org

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 2/12/17)

Baby Broccolini:

Broccolini is a hybrid between broccoli and Chinese kale (not actually baby broccoli). It can be cooked much the same way as regular broccoli but is more tender and takes less maintenance. Simply chop off an inch or two from the stems and either bake in the oven or toss in a stir fry with chopped garlic and olive oil. Like other vegetables, these are often blanched first before sautéing. Do this by cooking the broccolini in boiling water for about two minutes, then transfer to a bowl of ice water. Add olive to the pan and sauté the garlic, adding the broccolini back in at the end to reheat. To bake, toss in olive oil and spread evenly on a baking sheet. Bake at 425°F for 10-15 minutes until tender.

Russet Potatoes:

Russets have a flesh that’s snowy white and very dry, they are the quintessential baking potato. They also make first-rate mashed potatoes and the best French fries! Where they don’t shine is in recipes that call for boiling, as in most potato salads. Though russets make delicious pureed soups, it’s not a good idea to use them in any soup where you want the potatoes to stay in small, intact chunks.

Baby Bok Choy:

This Asian vegetable is in a class all on its own. Despite its delicate and light weight build, bok choy can be quite versatile. Try sautéing in a little olive oil and freshly minced garlic or follow the recipe below. I recently discovered that baby bok choy has a nice flavor without being cooked at all (not sure why I didn’t try it this sooner!) Plus, it has a wonderfully crunchy texture, which I love! So, if you’re not a fan of the squishier consistency of cooked bok choy, try tossing it into a salad with other salad veggies (can also use diced apple and raisons in this one!). Then top with your favorite dressing (a ginger vinaigrette works great) or try making your own! You could simply mix olive oil and vinegar with a little mustard (my go to), or try something a little fancier by blending ½ cup of soy, hemp, or almond milk, ½ cup cashews or ¼ cup cashew butter, ¼ cup balsamic vinegar, and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard.

Horseradish:

In our Northwest Boxes this week. Learn how to make your own horseradish sauce from scratch, here.

 

 

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Cherry Tomatoes

Can be served as a side or on top of rice noodles with soy sauce. Add other vegetables if desired.

Ingredients:

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 scallion, chopped

6-8 cherry tomatoes, halved

2 heads of baby bok choy, cut into1-inch pieces

1 tbsp olive oil

sea salt and pepper, to taste

juice of ½ lemon

Directions:

Preparation: 5 min Cook: 15 min Ready In: 20 Min

1. Wash and prepare ingredients.

2. In a medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat.

3. Add garlic, scallion and tomatoes and allow to sauté for 5 minutes or until soft and lightly browned 4. Add the bok choy and allow to cook for 3-5 minutes or until wilted, and add salt, pepper and lemon juice. 5. Remove from heat, serve and enjoy!

Recipe adapted from rebootwithjoe.com

 

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/4/16)

Baby Bok Choy:

This Asian vegetable is in a class all on its own. It has a delicate and almost foam like texture and can be quite versatile. Try sautéing in a little olive oil and freshly minced garlic. To add more flavor you can use a combination of lemon and tarragon, or try soy sauce, sesame oil or coconut aminos, sesame seeds and ginger for an Asian spin. Roasting is also a great way to cook bok choy. Look up recipes online or check out the links here and here.

Cauliflower:

There are so many ways to use this vegetable I don’t even know where to start. They can be chopped up and added to salad or soup, roasted in the oven, tossed in a stir fry, boiled and pureed as a stand-in for mashed potatoes or to make a creamy soup, baked into a pizza crust as a flourless alternative, or simply eaten raw. The options are endless! You don’t even have to cut it up. Try baking it whole by simply cutting off the leaves and stem so it can sit upright, baste in olive oil, salt and spices of your choice, and bake on a cookie sheet or cast iron skillet at 450° for about 45-60 minutes or until a knife can be inserted easily. Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower goes well in spicy dishes or curries as it soaks up all the other flavors. Here’s a source for recipes.

Celery:

I still remember making ants on a log at grandma’s house. Whoever came up with celery sticks filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins is a might more creative than I. Nowadays my favorite way to eat celery is in chicken soup. Chicken and celery were just meant to be together. There’s something about that flavor combo that touches the soul. Try using your celery along with onion, cilantro and cauliflower from this week’s box to make chicken soup!

Cabbage:

What can I say? Cabbage is just a great thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my just about anything. I like to cut mine into little cabbage “shavings”. First cut the cabbage in half, then simply shave off slivers from along the inside edge. I rarely ever use a whole cabbage in one sitting so to keep the cut edges from drying out I make sure to store sealed in a plastic bag or plastic wrap.

Mangos:

Mangos are one of my all-time favorite fruits. They have a unique flavor and creamy texture unlike any other fruit. They also pair well in cooked savory dishes. Mango fried rice is simply amazing. Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or salsa. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated or made into fruit leather. You can order a whole case and dehydrate them or try freezing to use in smoothies.

Turnips:

Northwest box Only This time of year our NW box comes well stocked in root vegetables. This hearty box is a great way to

experience locally grown food all year round. The turnip reminds me of a mix between a potato and a radish….and maybe a beet. It can be cooked much the same way as a potato, you can even boil them until tender and make mashed turnips! They can be roasted, sautéed, added to soup or even sliced up and eaten raw with a little salt and lemon juice. To season try adding a combo of salt, pepper, and lemon or when baking, toss in coconut oil, salt, pepper, ginger and drizzled in honey(roast at 400° until tender), or mashed you can top with butter, salt, pepper, chives and Parmesan.

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Fresh This Week Tips – Feb 22, 2011

BABY BOK CHOY – As far as cabbages go, baby bok choy are pretty irresistible!

STORE: Place in a plastic bag — but do not close — and refrigerate for no more than three days.
PREP: There is no need to cook the stalks and leaves separately – just wash the whole and drain and cut into small pieces.
USE: Bok Choy is normally used in stir-fries. But when the time comes to start cooking, you’ll find that bok choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the bok choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of bok choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes.

RED BELL PEPPERS
STORE: Store peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to five days.
PREP: Wash peppers just before using; remove the stem, seeds, and interior membranes, and add to salads, soups, or stir-fries.
USE: Peppers can be sautéed, steamed, or baked. Roast peppers by holding them over an open flame, or broiling them about 1/2-inch (1.25cm) from the broiler flame and rotating every minute or so until they blacken evenly. Put charred peppers in a plastic bag for about 10 minutes, then pull off the blackened peels and rinse the peppers under cold water. Pat dry, remove seeds and stems, and slice peppers. Use roasted pepper slices in salads, or purée in soups.

BUNCH CARROTS
STORE: Always remove tops from carrots as they take moisture from the “root” to stay green, leaving you with a limp carrot. Store carrots in the coolest part of the refrigerator in a plastic bag or wrapped in a paper towel to reduce the amount of moisture that is lost. They should keep for about two weeks. Be sure to store your carrots away from apples, pears, potatoes as they produce a gas that will make carrots bitter.
PREP:  Wash carrot roots and gently scrub them with a vegetable brush right before preparing them to eat. Peel (if desired) and chop according to your recipe or their purpose.
USE: You can steam, pickle, puree (for carrot soup!), juice, eat them raw or add them to any number of soups, stews and stir fries.

Do you hear what we hear? It is stir-fry time. See recipe: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chicken-Stir-Fry/Detail.aspx

Images from flickr.com