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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/5/18)

Melons, Cantaloupe      

Cantaloupe provide a range of antioxidants, phytonutrients, and electrolytes which have been shown to have multiple health benefits. Two types of powerful antioxidants in cantaloupe (carotenoids and cucurbitacins) have been linked with the prevention of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. They help to stop free radical damage within the body and slow the aging process. —dr.axe.dom

Storage and Eating: They may look hardy, but melons can perish quickly if not kept in the refrigerator. Keep ripe melons away from other fruit so that the ethylene gas that they produce does not speed up the fruit’s ripening. Uncut ripe melons should keep in the fridge for up to 5 days. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out ripe fruit and then freeze to add to smoothies.

Green Cabbage

Cabbage has the highest amount of some of the most powerful antioxidants found in cruciferous vegetables – phytonutrients such as thiocyanates, lutein, zeaxanthin, isothiocyanates, and sulforaphane, which stimulate detoxifying enzymes. Research has shown these compounds to protect against several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancers. They also help lower the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) or “bad cholesterol” levels in blood, which can build up in arteries and cause heart disease. —foodfacts.mercola.com

Eat it: Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. There are endless opportunities to use it up. You can add it to “just about anything” veggie-wise. Make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Featured Recipe: Cabbage Salad

This delicious, filling comes from the one by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. This combination of greens, seeds and currants will fill you up quickly and keep you full.

Ingredients:

3 ½ cups green cabbage, grated (approx. ½ cabbage)

1 carrot, peeled and grated

1 red pepper, thinly sliced

1/4 cup dried currants or cranberries

2 tbsp raw pumpkin seeds

2 tbsp raw sunflower seeds

1 tbsp unhulled sesame seeds

For dressing:

1/3 cup almond or hemp milk

1 apple, peeled and sliced

1/2 cup raw cashews

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Instructions:

Mix all salad ingredients together.

In a high-powered blender, blend almond/hemp milk, apple, cashews and vinegar and toss with salad.

Garnish with currants and lightly toasted sesame seeds.

Recipe adapted from Dr. Joel Fuhrman

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/26/17)

 

Kiwi

Kiwi is most commonly eaten as is by cutting in half and spooning out the inside, but it can also make a great addition to breakfast food, salad or dessert. It can be used in smoothies (try with bananas and avocado), as a topping for granola and yogurt or cereal, or as a decorative and delicious addition to pie or meringue. It makes a great addition to fruit salad or even a green salad if you’re feeling adventurous.

Why it’s GOOD for you: Kiwi is high in Vitamin C (per 100 grams you get 154 % of Vit. C— almost twice that of lemons and oranges), folate, and zinc, so it’s a great fruit to eat during the cold-season months. Vitamin C acts as powerful antioxidant, eliminating free radicals that could cause inflammation or cancer. It also helps in boosting the immunity of the body against harmful pathogens.

Green Cabbage

Try it: sauté cabbage with the portabella mushrooms in this week’s box. Cabbage and mushrooms go well together. In order to pep up sautéed cabbage, add a few sautéed mushrooms and voila! You’ve turned an ordinary side dish into a tasty concoction. Feel free to add a few snips of a favorite fresh herb to this, for example, dill would be great, as would thyme, but maybe not together. ?

Why it’s GOOD for you: a multi-layered veggie parcel and powerhouse of vitamins and minerals! Its high content of Vitamin A, B1, B2, B6, E, C, K, calcium, iron, iodine, potassium, sulphur, phosphorus and foliate makes it a superhero among the category of leafy vegetables. In the Far-Eastern regions, on an average each person consumes about a pound of fresh leafy-cabbage class vegetables per day; either in the form of raw greens, in stews or as pickled (kimchi, sauerkraut).

 

 

Featured Recipe: Stuffed Sunburst Squash

You can modify this recipe and adjust the ingredients to fit your taste. You can use many different kinds of vegetables or proteins for the filling, and add additional herbs and seasonings if you like. Some good additions are chopped nuts, carrots, green onion, riced cauliflower, fresh thyme or green chiles. Serves 4.

Ingredients:

 

4 Small Sunburst Squash

1 Cup of Shredded Chicken (or leftover turkey!)

1 Cup Spinach (or kale, or chard) Leaves

1/2 cup celery (optional, but great if you’re trying to use leftovers), finely chopped

1/2 cup red bell pepper, finely chopped

1/2 cup mushrooms, finely chopped

1/2 Cup Grated Parmesan Cheese

1/2 Chopped Onion

1 Minced Clove of Garlic

2 Tablespoons Oil (EVOO, or Sunflower)

Salt and Pepper to taste

 

Instructions:

  1. Pour 1 inch of water into a wide skillet, bring to a simmer.
  2. While you’re waiting for the water, slice a small portion of the ends off each squash. This will allow easier access to scoop them out, and also give them a ‘foot’ to stand on.
  3. When the water is ready, add the squash and let cook for five minutes on each side.
  4. When time has elapsed, remove from the water and allow to cool for a few minutes.
  5. Empty the water and dry your pan. Return it to the stove set on a burner at medium-high heat. Add your choice of oil and let it heat up (don’t allow it to get so hot it smokes – there’s no need for it to be so hot is scorches).
  6. In the meantime, scoop out the squash cavities. Save all that scooped out flesh! Use a clean towel to squeeze out the water left in the squash flesh. Chop them up and add them to the veggies in the next step.
  7. Sauté the onion, mushrooms, celery, pepper, and squash until they just start to turn a golden color (4-5 minutes), then add your minced garlic. Cook for 30 more seconds and remove from heat. Allow to cool for 5 minutes.
  8. Once cooled off slightly, add the spinach, chicken or turkey and 1/2 Cup of Parmesan cheese to the mixture. Season to taste with salt and pepper! (Alternately, you can place squashes on a sheet pan under a broiler in the oven for up to 1 minute or until cheese is melted.)

 

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/4/17)

Cabbage:

Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my “just about anything”. I like to make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese. Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

Leeks:

Leeks are cousins to the old, familiar onion, but have a sweeter, more delicate flavor reminiscent of garlic or chives and are delicious no matter how they’re cooked. Additionally, leeks contain generous amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making the vegetable a wise addition to a healthy diet. You can cook leeks by poaching them in chicken broth, pan-frying them in a little oil, or boiling them until tender, or you can include the leeks in a variety of other recipes (such as the one below).

 

Featured Recipe: Classic Potato Salad

Ingredients:

3 medium potatoes (1 to 1 ½ pounds), quartered

1 ½ tablespoons white vinegar

1 large celery stalks, diced

1 Leek, diced

3 hard boiled eggs, peeled

¾ cups mayonnaise

½ tablespoon yellow mustard

¾ teaspoons celery seed kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper paprika for garnish

Directions:

  1. Bring potatoes to a boil in large pot of cold water that’s been liberally salted. Reduce the heat to medium high or a lightly rolling boil and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the potatoes are easily pierced with a paring knife. Drain and let cool until just able to handle.
  2. Peel the skins from the potatoes and cut into large diced pieces. Transfer the warm potatoes to a large mixing bowl and sprinkle with the white vinegar and stir. Allow the potatoes to cool, about 15 minutes. Add the celery and leeks Chop 2 of the hard-boiled eggs and add to the potato mixture.
  3. In a medium bowl, mix the mayonnaise, yellow mustard, celery seed and salt and pepper. Mix well into the potato mixture and season with more salt and pepper if needed. Slice the last egg into thin slices and place the slices on top of the salad. Sprinkle with paprika if desired. Chill for at least 1 hour Recipe adapted from “foodiecrush.com”
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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 3/5/17)

Butternut Squash:

There are many, many ways to use this creamy squash, but my favorite way is in soup. It adds such a wonderfully rich and smooth texture that I can’t pass up any opportunity to pureed it. The key to getting that rich full flavor is to roast or sauté the squash first. You can peel, cut into cubes and sauté with onions and garlic until tender or cut in half, slather in olive oil and bake cut side down at 425° for about 50 minutes. If you follow the baking method, simply scrape the insides out with a spoon; no need for peeling. Then blend everything with 1-2 cups of milk (depending on how thick you want it). This can be eaten as is with salt, pepper, a quarter teaspoon cayenne pepper, and topped with cream and toasted nuts. Or, add to another soup recipe to thicken it up and enrich the flavors.

Yams:

Baked yams make one of my all-time favorite snacks. They are also a great added to soups, stir fries, burritos, you name it! Or, just eat them all by themselves as a snack/side dish. I like to dice mine up into small cubes, toss in a little olive oil with a pinch of salt and bake at 425° for about 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally until tender and edges are browned. Also, very good when sprinkled with cinnamon. Yum!

Cabbage:

Cabbage is such a great thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my “just about anything”. I like to cut mine into little cabbage “shavings”. First cut the cabbage in half, then simply shave off slivers from along the inside edge. I rarely ever use a whole cabbage in one sitting so to keep the cut edges from drying out I make sure to store sealed in a plastic bag or plastic wrap.

Recipe: Rainbow Chard Hummus Wraps

Ingredients:

1 large rainbow swiss chard leaf

1/4 cup hummus

Veggies for topping, such as tomato, cucumber + onion

Directions:

Preparation: 15 min

1. Rinse and dry your Swiss chard, chop off the stem, and shave the bottom thicker part of the stem so it will roll up easier.

2. Then, top the center with hummus and veggies, wrap up and enjoy. You can also secure it with toothpicks or wrap it in parchment to take on the go.

Recipe adapted from minimalistbaker.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/4/16)

Baby Bok Choy:

This Asian vegetable is in a class all on its own. It has a delicate and almost foam like texture and can be quite versatile. Try sautéing in a little olive oil and freshly minced garlic. To add more flavor you can use a combination of lemon and tarragon, or try soy sauce, sesame oil or coconut aminos, sesame seeds and ginger for an Asian spin. Roasting is also a great way to cook bok choy. Look up recipes online or check out the links here and here.

Cauliflower:

There are so many ways to use this vegetable I don’t even know where to start. They can be chopped up and added to salad or soup, roasted in the oven, tossed in a stir fry, boiled and pureed as a stand-in for mashed potatoes or to make a creamy soup, baked into a pizza crust as a flourless alternative, or simply eaten raw. The options are endless! You don’t even have to cut it up. Try baking it whole by simply cutting off the leaves and stem so it can sit upright, baste in olive oil, salt and spices of your choice, and bake on a cookie sheet or cast iron skillet at 450° for about 45-60 minutes or until a knife can be inserted easily. Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower goes well in spicy dishes or curries as it soaks up all the other flavors. Here’s a source for recipes.

Celery:

I still remember making ants on a log at grandma’s house. Whoever came up with celery sticks filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins is a might more creative than I. Nowadays my favorite way to eat celery is in chicken soup. Chicken and celery were just meant to be together. There’s something about that flavor combo that touches the soul. Try using your celery along with onion, cilantro and cauliflower from this week’s box to make chicken soup!

Cabbage:

What can I say? Cabbage is just a great thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my just about anything. I like to cut mine into little cabbage “shavings”. First cut the cabbage in half, then simply shave off slivers from along the inside edge. I rarely ever use a whole cabbage in one sitting so to keep the cut edges from drying out I make sure to store sealed in a plastic bag or plastic wrap.

Mangos:

Mangos are one of my all-time favorite fruits. They have a unique flavor and creamy texture unlike any other fruit. They also pair well in cooked savory dishes. Mango fried rice is simply amazing. Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or salsa. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated or made into fruit leather. You can order a whole case and dehydrate them or try freezing to use in smoothies.

Turnips:

Northwest box Only This time of year our NW box comes well stocked in root vegetables. This hearty box is a great way to

experience locally grown food all year round. The turnip reminds me of a mix between a potato and a radish….and maybe a beet. It can be cooked much the same way as a potato, you can even boil them until tender and make mashed turnips! They can be roasted, sautéed, added to soup or even sliced up and eaten raw with a little salt and lemon juice. To season try adding a combo of salt, pepper, and lemon or when baking, toss in coconut oil, salt, pepper, ginger and drizzled in honey(roast at 400° until tender), or mashed you can top with butter, salt, pepper, chives and Parmesan.

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Caramelized Leeks and Cabbage

We know some people aren’t huge fans of cabbage, because it can be bitter. Want to know some good news? It’s actually really, incredibly easy to make caramelized cabbage that isn’t bitter, bland or boring. Here’s what you’ll need:

Caramelized Leeks and Cabbage

1 medium leek (or 1 medium onion)

1 1/2 tablespoon butter (or olive oil- but butter really is the most delicious here),

1 head green cabbage.

Trim, separate, and wash the leeks. Rough chop the white parts of the leek, then sauté in pan with butter on medium heat.

Cut stem off cabbage, then slice in 1/2″ thick wedges, removing any tough stem parts as you go.

Pull apart cabbage into shreds, toss in pan.

Rotate cabbage every 5 minutes or so (it will wilt- not as much as spinach but quite a bit). You want to get some great brown caramelized bits on all the shreds of cabbage, but you don’t want them to burn- so tossing often is key.

When the cabbage is a golden color with lots of browned bits, you’re done!

Serve as a side dish for Corned Beef, chicken, or really any dish. You can also add broth or stock and turn it into a soup. The leftovers actually taste better a day later. Just re-heat them by quickly sautéing in a pan again.

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The Recipe Box: Chopped Kale Salad + Creamy Almond Ginger Dressing

salad_kale chopped2_edibleperspective.com_used by permission

This week’s recipe box features the ingredients for a recipe from Ashley McLaughlin, the person behind the inspiring blog over at Edible Perspective. I was looking for a recipe to feature the local kale we’d be getting in this week from our friends over at Ralph’s Greenhouses, and came across this one for a chopped kale salad paired with a creamy dressing – a fresh change up from the usual steamed or sautéed kale recipes.

Ashley’s salad starts out with the simple step of steaming and blanching asparagus, and then incorporates a healthy variety of textures and flavors in the form of more finely chopped (mostly raw) veggies. She then tops it all off with protein-rich quinoa and chickpeas, a creamy almond dressing infused with ginger, and finally some marinated Portabella mushrooms. Add a sprinkling of sesame seeds if you will. This is a very filling and satisfying weeknight meal. You can find the full recipe on her blog.

 

The Recipe BoxWe’ll plan, pack, and deliver…you cook and enjoy!

This box contains a recipe and all of the ingredients you will need for assembling a healthy meal for 4 people plus some additional fruit to enjoy.

This week’s featured recipe: Chopped Kale Salad + Creamy Almond Ginger Dressing

Chopped kale & cabbage covered in a creamy dressing (we’ve included directions for an almond dressing), and topped with marinated portabella mushrooms, more veggies, and chick peas. Trust us, it’s delish! Order your Recipe Box here.

Happy salad fixing!

Marty, for the Klesick Family Farm

 

Photos: Copyright © 2013, [Edible Perspective]. All rights reserved. Used by permission.