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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 4/29/18)

Cucumbers:

Now we’ve probably all had cucumber salad at some point, but I still tend to forget that it makes a great main ingredient for salad, not just as a topping. Try marinating thinly sliced cucumber, onion, bell pepper, crushed garlic cloves in a one to one mixture water and white (or cider) vinegar and a tablespoon of sugar. Cover and let sit in refrigerator for a couple hours. If you leave it overnight the flavors come out even more! Drain and enjoy. Try adding a garnish of freshly chopped parsley or dill.

 

Chard:

Both the leaves and stalk of chard are edible, although the stems vary in texture with the white ones being the most tender. When you get your box, give your chard a quick rinse in cold water, spin dry, and store in a Ziploc bag to use in smoothies, salads, stir fry’s, and as a wrap for tacos. Unless you’re using the chard as a wrap, you can take your meal prep a step further and tear the leaves into fork-friendly pieces to speed up your meal prep all week long.

 

Radishes:

Store radishes in the crisper in a perforated bag. If you’re planning on eating the tops, use within 2 days. If you don’t plan to use the tops, twist them off prior to refrigerating to extend the life of the radish bulbs to a week. Radishes are great fresh, poached, baked, or pickled.

 

Featured Recipe: Avocado Toast Deluxe

Easy, healthy, and delicious. Made with sautéed rainbow chard, chives, sun-dried tomato, avocado, and sauce drizzles. Serves 2

 

Ingredients:

2 pieces of toast

1 small avocado

Approximately 1 Tbsp chives – cut however you’d like

4 leaves of rainbow chard – chopped

1 Tbsp tomatoes, medium dice

2 Tbsp spoons loosely packed cilantro

1 Green Onion, diced

Salt & pepper to taste

Olive oil for pan

Hot sauce to taste (optional)

Vegan Ranch to taste (optional)

Instructions:

While your bread is toasting, heat pan with olive oil and add the chard, sun-dried tomatoes, and green onions. Season with salt and pepper to taste

Cook for approximately 3 minutes on medium or medium high and then remove from heat

Smash 1/2 of an avocado on to each toast and then evenly divide the contents from the pan on top of the toasts

Sprinkle the cilantro evenly across both toasts

Drizzle with ranch and hot sauce to taste if desired.

 

Recipe adapted from foodgalleygab.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/16/17)

Fortune Plums:

Great in fruit salads, atop green salads (think Balsamic vinegar, goat cheese, walnuts, red onions) because they’re firm enough to hold up with a little tossing. Try them atop plain green yogurt with a drizzle of honey for breakfast. Plums are particularly delicious in fruit galettes as baking them brings out their sweet-tart flavor. If too firm to use, place in a closed paper bag at room temperature for one to two days.

How to Store: Once ripe, plums can be kept in a plastic bag in the refrigerator up to three days.

Rainbow Chard:

Both the leaves and stalk of chard are edible, although the stems vary in texture with the white ones being the most tender. When you get your box, give your chard a quick rinse in cold water, spin dry, and store in a Ziploc bag to use in smoothies, salads, stir fry’s, and as a wrap for tacos. Unless you’re using the chard as a wrap, you can take your meal prep a step further and tear the leaves into fork-friendly pieces to speed up your meal prep all week long.

Cucumber:

Now we’ve probably all had cucumber salad at some point but I still tend to forget that it makes a great main ingredient for salad, not just as a topping. Try marinating thinly sliced cucumber, onion, bell pepper, crushed garlic cloves in a one to one mixture water and white (or cider) vinegar and a tablespoon of sugar. Cover and let sit in refrigerator for a couple hours. If you leave it overnight the flavors come out even more! Drain and enjoy. Try adding a garnish of freshly chopped parsley or dill.

 

 

Grilled Plums with Burrata and Balsamic Basil Vinaigrette

A simple and quick summer fruit salad, featuring grilled plums atop creamy burrata, paired with fresh lettuce and a balsamic basil vinaigrette.

Ingredients

For Dressing: For Salad:

1/8 cup olive oil

1 tablespoon minced basil

2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

1 pinch kosher salt

1 pinch black pepper

4 ripe plums, halved and pitted

2 tablespoons olive oil

8 ounces burrata (try to get two balls of burrata)

4 leaves romaine, sliced into ribbons

4 leaves fresh basil

A pinch of kosher salt

Directions:

For Dressing:

In a small bowl, whisk together ingredients for the balsamic dressing until emulsified. Set aside.

For Salad:

  1. Heat grill to high heat. Brush flesh side of plums with olive oil and grill, flesh side down, until the plums develop brown charred markings. This should take about 5-8 minutes, but will depend on your grill and how hot it is. You could also use a grill pan, or the grill side of a panini press (my favorite way to make this salad!). When plums are grilled, set aside and allow to cool for about 10 minutes.
  2. Cut the burrata balls into quarters and divide evenly between two plates. When plums have cooled, divide them evenly on the plates. Top each plate with a handful of the sliced romaine and 2 leaves of fresh basil. Drizzle each plate with the balsamic basil dressing and a small pinch of kosher salt. Adapted from thecharmingdetroiter.com

 

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How To Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/11/17)

How to cook your box:

Nectarines: You can either eat these smooth-skinned stonefruits crisp and hard like an apple, or set out on the counter to allow to ripen for a day or two if you like them sweeter and soft. Test for ripeness by fragrance and by gently pressing around the stem – it should give to light pressure when ripe. Place in sealed container in the fridge when ripe – if you leave them exposed to the open air in the fridge, they will wrinkle from dehydration. Nectarines, like other stonefruit, ripen from the inside to the outside, so if fruit is soft all over it is more likely overripe. Try nectarines for breakfast paired with yogurt or hot/cold cereal, as a topping to a green salad, and as an ingredient in fruit salads. Nectarines are also great on the grill, but be sure to use slightly less ripe fruit, it will hold up better without breaking apart/juicing. And of course, nectarines bake up fabulously into crisps, pies, and sauces!

Carrots: Twist the tops off those carrots as soon as they arrive so that they stay nice and crisp in the refrigerator. If you’re reading this, you’ve chosen organically grown carrots, so give yourself a fist bump. ? Carrots are so important to get organic because conventionally grown carrots are often a concentrated source of heavy metals, nitrates and pesticides. Eating carrots is a healthy alternative to junk food, and just one carrot can boost your willpower that is in resistance to those processed foods. Consider adding bunch carrots on to your order on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. Your body will thank you!

Recipe for Roasted Carrots with Spicy Green Sauce

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard is loaded with vitamins A, K, and C and when consumed raw there are significant amounts of vitamin E and Iron. Besides a being a great green for a quick sauté similar to kale or spinach, swiss chard is great eaten raw. Cut into fine ribbons and tossed in a salad along with a fine mince of their brilliantly colored stems for a bit of crunch.

The frilly leaves are perfect smoothie fodder as their mild flavor is hardly detected when there are frozen berries involved (a must to get our youngest to enjoy her smoothie).

Along with salads, sautés and smoothies the hardy chard stems are perfect for a quick pickle. Make up a simple bring with vinegar, spices a bit of salt and a faint touch of honey then warm over the stove. Turn off the heat then add chard stems. Let them cool in the brine then refrigerate for up to two weeks. Dice them up then add to salads or serve alongside a cheese platter or simple snack on them throughout the day.

Cauliflower

This little vegetable darling is finally getting the spotlight it deserves. It boasts high levels of vitamin C and moderate levels of Vitamins B and K. Really though it’s quite possibly the most delicious vegetable after a good roast in the oven.

Vegetable butchers praise the cauliflower steak. If you think I’m kidding about any part of that last sentence you are mistaken. Cut a cauliflower into thick 1-inch slices. Slather with olive oil then sprinkle with sea salt and pepper then roast in a 400°F oven until tender and the edges are deeply caramelized and even charred in parts. Top with a simple salsa of fresh herbs, lemon, garlic and olive oil. A fried egg on top of that makes a fine dinner or breakfast. Or chop the cauliflower into florets and roast in the same way. Toss with chili flakes, pasta and fresh goat cheese for a simple dinner.

And since I can’t stop talking about tacos today, roasted cauliflower makes a mighty fine taco add in too. Pulverized in a food processor cauliflower resembles the texture of rice or couscous. Baked or even consumed raw you have a lovely vegetable alternative. Check out this recipe for a raw cauliflower tabouli.

Cauliflower Tabouli

Swiss Chard and Caramelized Onion Tacos

from Mexican Everyday, by Rick Bayless

Serves 4

Ingredients:

12 oz. bunch of Swiss chard, thick lower stems removed, cut into 1/2-inch ribbons (10 oz. cleaned

spinach can be used instead)

1 1/2 tbsp. oil, lard or bacon drippings

1 large onion, thinly sliced

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tsp. red pepper flakes (add more or less depending on how spicy you like it)

1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth (water works too)

Salt

12 warm corn tortillas

1 cup (4 ounces) Queso Fresco or other fresh cheese such as feta or goat cheese

Salsa, for serving

Directions:

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion then cook until golden brown, about 10 to 15 minutes. To the onions add the red pepper flakes and garlic. Stir for about 20 seconds until you are hit with the aroma of the garlic then immediately add the broth or water, ½ teaspoon salt and the greens. Adjust the heat to medium-low then cover the skillet. Cook until the greens are almost tender. For Swiss chard this will be about 5 minutes. Spinach only takes about 2 minutes.

Uncover the pan, adjust the heat to medium-high then cook until the juices have reduced significantly and merely glaze the greens. Taste and add salt if you think it needs it.

Serve with the corn tortillas, crumbled fresh cheese and Chipotle salsa.

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How To Keep Your Greens Fresh

The key to keeping greens fresh is to pre-wash, dry and store them. Try to wash your greens the same day that yourbox of good is delivered. Try to make sure when you’re unpacking your box to set the lettuce and any other greens on the kitchen counter, so you don’t forget to wash them.

First off, fill a large bowl with some cold water and swirl the leaves around to get rid of the excess dirt. When washing kale, de-stem it as you’re washing it. That will save you time when it comes to throwing that kale salad together. Place in salad spinner, give the spinner a whirl, and spin until your greens are dry.

Spread two paper towels (still connected) on your counter and pile the dry lettuce/kale/spinach/other leaves on one end. Wrap the paper towel around your greens and then add some more leaves and continue the process until all the greens are wrapped up.  Make sure to wrap the leaves up gently but tightly, a lot like you would a sleeping bag.

Place the wrapped lettuce inside sealed plastic bags and store in your crisper drawer. The lettuce should stay good for about a week to two weeks.  Honestly, you should never keep those greens around for more than a week anyway.

Now that you have some freshly washed greens, you can make some amazing salads on the fly. Here’s to eating more greens!

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Know Your Produce: Swiss Chard

Chard belongs to the same family as beets and spinach and shares a similar taste profile: it has the bitterness of beet greens and the slightly salty flavor of spinach leaves. Both the leaves and stalk of chard are edible, although the stems vary in texture with the white ones being the most tender.

To store, place unwashed chard in the refrigerator in a plastic bag. It will keep fresh for several days. If you have large batches of chard, you can blanch the leaves and then freeze them.

To prep: Wash the chard well to remove any sand or soil that may be hidden in the leaves. One way to do this is to immerse pieces of cut chard in a bowl of cool water, swirling them around to remove any dirt and then quickly rinsing them with cool running water. Trim the bottom end of the stalk. If you find the stalks to be more fibrous than desired, make incisions near the base of the stalk and peel away the fibers, like you would do with celery.

To enjoy: Treat chard much like you would any other green (spinach, kale, bok choy), sauté, steam, or chop and add to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes. Chard can also be baked into “chips” by removing the stems and tossing with sea salt and olive oil. Place on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and bake in a preheated 350°F oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are brown but not burnt.