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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 3/18/18)

Blood Oranges:

With ruby-red to maroon-colored flesh, blood oranges are a surprise when you cut them open; taste-wise, they’re tart-sweet and slightly berry-like.

Storage tips: To keep these ruby gems fresh longer, choose refrigeration over the fruit bowl―they’ll only last only a couple of days at room temperature, but up to two weeks in the fridge.

How to eat them: Blood oranges are best eaten fresh―out of hand, or in salads, salsas, or marmalades. If you’re following a recipe you may be asked to section the fruit. To do so, peel the orange, cut between the white membranes to expose the flesh, and remove the sections (for more juice, squeeze the leftover membranes).

Health benefits: Oranges are rich in antioxidants―vital for healthy cells―including vitamin C, which aids in healing, boosts your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and even helps reduce the risk of cancer. This citrus fruit is also a good source of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and, like vitamin C, reduce your cancer risk. (To maximize your fiber intake, be sure to eat some of the spongy white pith right under the skin.)

 

 

Mangos:

To peel a mango: using the tip of the mango as a guide, slice the two cheeks of the mango off, cutting around the stone in the center. Then place the edge of the mango against the lip of a glass and slide it down one of the halves, so that you’re using the glass like a giant spoon to scrape the mango from its skin. If your mango is ripe (yields to soft pressure, fragrant), you can get the glass to slide through it and separate the skin with ease. If you want to get the part around the pit, we advise going at it with a paring knife, or if you have a toddler, this will keep them busy for a while. Then, you can eat the half of mango, or, if you’re sharing, slice it up, cut it into cubes, and dump into a bowl, ready to serve!

 

Broccoli:

Baked broccoli is one of my favorite dinner sides. I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with a little garlic, salt and pepper. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese.

Broccoli is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

 

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or salad, but can also be used to liven up your Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. You can even grill them whole like spring onions and serve as a side dish with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Yams

Serves 4

Ingredients:

 

2 large yams

1 tablespoon honey

1-2 teaspoons crushed red-pepper flakes (or to taste)

2 teaspoons smoked paprika

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

¼ cup plain Greek-style yogurt

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice, approximately 2 limes

2 green onions, both green and white parts, trimmed and thinly sliced, for garnish

Instructions:

Heat oven to 425. Cut the yams lengthwise into 4 wedges per yam. Put them in a large bowl, and toss them with the honey, ½ tablespoon of the crushed red-pepper flakes, the smoked paprika and 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Let it sit for 10 minutes or so, tossing once or twice to coat, as the oven heats.

Transfer the yams to a foil-lined, rimmed baking sheet, season with salt and pepper and then bake until they are deeply caramelized around the edges and soft when pierced with a fork at their thickest part, approximately 30 to 35 minutes.

As the yams roast, combine the yogurt, lime juice and remaining tablespoon of olive oil in a small bowl, and whisk to combine, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

When the yams are done, transfer them to a serving platter, drizzle the yogurt over them and garnish with the remaining pepper flakes, the green onions and some flaky sea salt.

 

Adapted from recipe by cooking.nytimes.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/12/17)

How to EAT…

Celery Root (Celeriac):

Celery root or celeriac is prized for its distinctive flavor which is somewhere between celery and parsley. Although cooked celery root is excellent in soups, stew, and other hot dishes, it can also be enjoyed raw, especially grated and tossed in salads. Raw celery root has an intense flavor that tends to dominate salads, so pair it with other strongly flavored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, beets, and apples. Before using celery root, peel and soak briefly in water with a little vinegar or lemon juice to prevent cut surfaces from darkening.

 

Green Onions (Scallions):

Don’t be afraid to use the entire green onion! Green onions, also called scallions, make an excellent garnish to soups, salads, noodle or rice dishes.

STORE: Store green onions in a plastic bag in your crisper for five to seven days. Be sure to keep them away from fruits and veggies that absorb odors easily like mushrooms, corn and apples.

PREP: Rinse your green onions in cold water; trim off roots and the very tops of the greens. Dice into thin or slightly thicker rounds depending on your preference.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Cauliflower & Celery Root Soup

Makes 8 servings

 

INGREDIENTS

 

1 tablespoon olive oil

8 cups cauliflower florets with stems chopped into ½-inch pieces (1 large head)

4 cups chopped celery root (½-inch pieces), about 1 medium root

2 large carrots, peeled and diced into ½-inch pieces

1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced, or 1 red onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

8 cups organic vegetable or chicken broth

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste

½ teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground green cardamom

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 can (13.5 ounces) coconut milk

 

For Garnish: Breadfarm bread cubes (optional), peppers, finely chopped green onion or chives, lime wedges

 

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

2. Chop cauliflower, celery root, carrots, green onion and garlic. Place a heavy bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Drizzle in olive oil. When shimmering, add onions, and carrots. Cook for about 3 minutes, add garlic, and cook another 2 minutes, stirring often to keep garlic from burning. Toss in the cauliflower and celery root. Pour in broth; add your spices, and stir well. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes or until vegetables are fork tender.

 

3. Stir in the coconut milk. (Note: if you like your soups more brothy, you may opt to skip this step which makes the soup thicker and more like a chowder.) Remove half of the vegetables from pot. Use an immersion blender to puree the remaining soup in the pot. Alternately, add remaining soup to a blender, in batches, and blend until smooth. Return blended soup to pot along with reserved vegetables and stir well to combine. Taste soup for seasoning, adding more salt or pepper to taste. Divide soup between 8 large soup bowls. Top with croutons and garnish with peppers and onions. Squeeze a bit of lime juice over the bowls, to taste.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (week of 1/8/2017)

Spinach:

Spinach is one of those handy vegetables that can be used raw or cooked. Used in salad, it’s a nice change from the norm. Try using thinly sliced green onions, cucumber, and apples from this week’s box in yours! For dressing, vinaigrettes go well with spinach. I like to mix balsamic vinegar with olive oil but just about any dressing will do. Spinach is used in cooking just as often as it is used fresh. It makes a great addition for scrambled eggs, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, pasta, or sauté. Some like to sauté it up in just a little olive oil and garlic and eat it like Popeye. I even enjoy adding a handful to my smoothies.

Celery:

Celery is a popular finger food as well as a flavorful addition to soups. Because of their shape, they are great for stuffing for a fun and flavorful snack. You can get pretty creative when it comes to what you put on them: Peanut butter is the first thing that comes to mind but you can stuff your celery with just about anything. Cream cheese makes a good filler, try it mixed with chopped nuts and raisins. Celery is also often used in salad. You can go sweet: using thinly sliced apples, pecans, raisins, yogurt or sour cream, honey and a pinch of cinnamon or make it savory with lettuce or spinach, finely chopped onion, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar, salt and pepper.

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or on salad. I like adding them to my soup. They add a freshness to Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle soup. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. Or, you can even grill them whole like spring onions and eat them all by themselves with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little

salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

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Vegetable Stir Fry

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic scapes, chopped
2 tablespoons peanut sauce
1 cup chopped broccoli
1 cup sliced carrots
1 cup sliced green cabbage
1 cup sliced celery
1 cup fresh snap peas
1 cup sliced zucchini
1 cup sliced tomato
1 cup chopped green onions
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon cornstarch

Directions:

  1. Heat oil in a wok or large heavy skillet. Add garlic and peanut sauce, and stir-fry for 4 minutes.
  2. Stir in broccoli, carrots, cabbage, celery, snap peas, zucchini, tomato, and green onions. Season with salt, and stir-fry for 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. In a small bowl, mix together water, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Stir into vegetables, and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, or until sauce is thickened.
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Fresh This Week Tips, Week 11.14.10

Pinova Apples
STORE: Pinova apples are crisp and juicy with dense flesh. Their mild, well-balanced sweet-tart flavor improves in storage so don’t worry about using them right away. Just store your apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator and use within two months.
PREP: Wash your apples prior to eating under cool water. Peel, core and chop them for your desired recipe.
USE: This apple is good for eating out of hand and cooking. Why not enjoy a healthy dessert by making a simple apple crisp with oatmeal, a little organic evaporated cane sugar and sliced Pinova apples? http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=11935

Pomegranates
Though the ancients used pomegranate skin and bark for medicinal purposes, only the seeds are edible. Fresh pomegranate is usually available from September until January.

STORE: When refrigerated in a plastic bag, pomegranates will keep for up to 2 months.
TO SEED: Wash fruit under cool running water. Slice off the top and the tail of the pomegranate. With a sharp paring knife, score as you would to peel an orange. Submerge pomegranate in bowl of cold water (so any juice that sprays out won’t get on your clothes- pomegranate juice stains) and peel away rind. Break into sections, and pull seeds from the pith with your fingers. Drain seeds in a sieve and throw away the pith. Be sure to drain well.
USE: Pomegranate seeds can be safely stored in the refrigerator or even frozen, for later use. However, this fruit is so delicious that it is most often consumed in one setting. Have you eaten YOUR pomegranate, today? The seeds are a brilliantly colorful addition when tossed on a salad. Check out this website, dedicated to only pomegranates for more recipe ideas and preparation tips http://pomegranates.org/recipes.html

Persimmons
STORE: Store ripe Fuyu persimmons at room temperature for up to three weeks. They will keep in the refrigerator for up to two months. Persimmons are ripe when they turn a dark orange, they will still be fairly firm.
PREP: Prepare ripe persimmons by hulling them (cutting out their top and its attached flesh), slicing, and peeling them. Remove and discard the large black seeds as you encounter them.
USE: Add sliced persimmons to a salad, whip up a smoothie or make a festive persimmon pudding.
Image from blog.fatfreevegan.com.

Lactinato/ Green Kale
STORE: Wrap unwashed kale in paper towels and keep it in the crisper of your refrigerator for up to five days. You can also freeze your kale by washing, chopping and storing in it in a freezer bag.
PREP: To wash kale, submerge it in water and swish around to remove dirt. Break or cut off tough stems and chop to your preference.
USE: Kale can be steamed, blanched, boiled, braised, stir-fried, or sautéed. Lacinato kale (also called dinosaur kale or tuscan kale) is especially delicious when added to a minestrone soup or cooked in extra virgin olive oil with garlic, a pinch of red pepper flakes and salt.

Image from chow.com.

Green Onions
STORE: Store green onions in a plastic bag in your crisper for five to seven days. Be sure to keep them away from fruits and veggies that absorb odors easily like mushrooms, corn and apples.
PREP: Rinse your green onions in cold water; trim off roots and the very tops of the greens. Dice into thin or slightly thicker rounds depending on your preference. Don’t be afraid to use the entire green onion!
USE: Green onions, also called scallions, make an excellent garnish to soups, salads, noodle or rice dishes. Check out the Farmgirl Fare blog for recipes that showcase the wonderful flavor of green onions: http://www.farmgirlfare.com/2008/06/wanted-your-favorite-recipes-ways-to.html. Scroll down to the comments section of her post to see what her readers have to say–scallion pancakes, pickled scallions and green onion soup, yum!