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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 6/3/18)

Apricots:

Ripen apricots in a paper bag at room temperature for 2 to 3 days. Unripe apricots can be stored at room temperature up to 5 days. Refrigerate ripe apricots in a sealed container up to one week. (Be sure that they are ripened first, as they will not ripen in the refrigerator.)

broccolini

Broccolini:

Broccolini is tender enough to enjoy stems and all. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and seasonings of choice. Bake on a cookie sheet at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy, and the stems are tender. For extra flavor, drizzle with lemon juice or top with parmesan cheese. Steaming broccolini, until al-dente is a great non-oil alternative. Broccolini is also great in salad, stir-fry, soup, or raw with your favorite veggie dip.

crimini mushrooms

Crimini Mushrooms:

Great raw on salads but absolutely fabulous when sautéed. There really isn’t a better ingredient around that works just as well in a breakfast, lunch or dinner plate. To sauté, heat oil or butter in a skillet on medium high heat. Clean and slice mushrooms in half inch pieces. When oil is hot add them to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

 

 

Roasted Yam and Asparagus Lentil Salad (vegan, gluten free)

Hearty and filling, this roasted yam and asparagus lentil salad is great on its own or as a side dish. Lentils add some healthy plant based proteins. Makes 6 servings.

Ingredients:

2 lbs. Yams, cut into quarters

¾ cup lentils

8 oz. bunch of asparagus

3 Tbsp vegetable oil

1 generous handful chopped spinach or kale

6 sundried tomatoes in oil (roughly chopped)

FOR THE DRESSING:

1 garlic clove, crushed and minced

1/2 tsp of salt

2 tsp wholegrain mustard

4 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

3 Tbsp lemon juice

1 shallot (optional)

2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

Instructions:

Toss yams with 3 Tbsp of vegetable oil and place on a tray, in the oven for 40 mins. Assemble dressing ingredients while yams are cooking.

Heat some water in a saucepan. When the water is boiling, add the lentils and cook for 10-15mins until soft (they should still have a bite). When done drain the lentils and set aside in a large salad bowl.

Snap off the tougher ends of the asparagus and discard. Chop the rest of the asparagus in thirds. 10 to 15 mins before the end of the potatoes cooking time, add the asparagus to the oven tray to roast. When all the vegetables are cooked, add them to the lentils. Toss together with the dressing. Leave everything to cool for 5 mins, then add the chopped spinach leaves and sundried tomatoes. Toss again until everything is well mixed together. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

Recipe adapted from www.theflexitarian.co.uk

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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 5/14/17)

Red Bell Peppers:

Red Peppers are a great way to add a bit of color to your food which is not only appealing to the eye but good for your eyes! Literally, they are packed with vitamin A, which is essential for good vision. These bright red veggies pair well with most savory dishes and can be added to soups, stir fries, salad, shish kabobs, or as a part of a veggie tray. They are also commonly used for stuffing because of their perfect cup shape. It’s best to eat your peppers right away, while still fresh. Don’t let them sit around too long as they lose their crunch and can become rubbery….bleh.

Mangos, Ataulfo:

Unlike other mangos, Ataulfos should be soft and slightly wrinkled when ripe. They change color from green to a beautiful rich yellow when they are at their sweetest. They also have a creamier texture and don’t get those annoying stringy fibers like other mangos do. Eat them raw or try adding them to one of your favorite cooked savory dishes. Fried rice with mango is simply amazing! Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or in salsa. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated, or made into fruit leather. You can order a whole case and dehydrate them or freeze to use in smoothies.

Artichokes:

Artichokes can be steamed, boiled, baked or grilled. The recipe below gives instructions on boiling but they are also great when baked. To prepare, cut about an inch off the top and stem of the artichoke. Then cut it in half and remove the fuzzy part in the center with a spoon. Rub the cut side with a half a lemon, squeezing some juice into the fold and the middle. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper and freshly minced garlic. Bake on a cookie sheet for about 25 minutes at 425°. Melted butter or mayonnaise mixed with a little balsamic vinegar is commonly used for a dip but you can be creative and use whatever your taste buds desire!

Recipe: Steamed Artichoke with Lemony Aioli

Ingredients:

-2 artichokes, stems, and tips of leaves trimmed to remove any prickly edges

-1/2 cup light mayonnaise (preferably made with sunflower or avocado oil)

-1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

-1/2 teaspoon salt

-1/2 teaspoon pepper

-pinch of whole cloves (2-4)

-1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

-Water, for cooking

Directions:

1. In a large sauce pan (large enough to fit the artichokes side by side upright), bring about two-three inches of water to an aggressive simmer.

2. Cut the stem off each artichoke so it can sit upright on its own, and place the artichokes upright in the pan. Sprinkle the whole cloves over the top so that they settle among the artichoke leaves. Cover and let simmer for about 45 minutes until the leaves are tender. (Test by poking with a fork) Add more water as needed so that it doesn’t run dry and the artichoke doesn’t burn.

3. While the artichoke is cooking, whisk together the mayonnaise, lemon juice, salt, pepper and garlic powder.

4. Once cooked, remove the artichoke carefully with tongs into a platter (cover if not serving immediately), and serve with the aioli.

Recipe adapted from honeyandspiceblog.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 4/9/17)

How to Eat Your Box:

 

Rhubarb

I’m thinking of starting a countdown-to-rhubarb calendar. Every day I’d get the satisfaction of crossing off another day knowing that I was inching my way closer to enjoying one of my favorite vegetables. Yes, I said vegetable.
Rhubarb is a hearty plant that thrives in the Pacific Northwest. It has a short season that begins in early spring. It’s often one of the first signs that let’s us know spring is indeed coming. And you know what my rhubarb countdown calendar is telling me right now? IT’S TIME FOR RHUBARB!
The leaves are poisonous so we’ll stay away from those but the celery like stalks have a crisp, tart crunch. Fresh rhubarb stalks should look firm and glossy. When sugar is added the tartness is tamed to the point of palatability and you are left with a floral flavor that somehow matches its brilliant pink color (although some varieties are green) that maintains a puckering sharpness that I find irresistible.
But sugar is not rhubarb’s only friend. Rhubarb makes a beautiful pickle to top salads or sit charmingly on a cheese board. Or in chutneys and sauces to serve alongside roast pork or chicken.
My favorite and most used way with rhubarb is to cut the stalks in 3-inch sticks then roast with a bit of sugar (or honey) – not too much as I love to retain the mouth clutching brightness. Sometimes I’ll even throw in a vanilla bean or some fresh ginger. Roast (400°F) for about 20 minutes. Don’t disturb the stalks too much as they are incredibly tender when they cook. Serve on top of yogurt or oatmeal in the morning, put in between layers of cake or serve over ice cream for dessert.

 

Garnet Yams

Garnet Yams are the brilliantly orange colored tubers that often get mistaken for a sweet potato. Yams and sweet potatoes are in fact distinctively different. However, because of mislabeling in American grocery stores, these two are commonly confused.
Yams are more nutrient dense than potatoes as they have good amounts of potassium, vitamin B6 and vitamin C but I often use them in the same way as potatoes. They are delicious baked and loaded with beans, scallions and a bit of cheese. Or, make a lovely mash or soup. They have a natural sweetness that pairs nicely with something acidic like lemons or vinegars.
As with most vegetables, yams are delicious roasted. Cut into wedges then toss with a little bit of cornstarch and finely grated Parmesan. The cornstarch helps to lock in the moisture so they turn crispy and more fry-like in the oven. Drizzle on a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper then roast in a hot oven 425-450°F for 20 – 30 minutes or until caramelized in parts and tender.
NOTE: Read Ashley’s guest post for this week’s newsletter, here.

 

 

Featured Recipe: RHUBARB FLOATS

By Ashley Rodriguez, Not Without Salt

Of all the many wonderful uses of rhubarb this syrup remains my favorite. It’s a fridge staple all through spring as it easily becomes the base for numerous cocktails, sodas and now ice cream floats. I love the warmth the spice brings but just rhubarb alone is great too. Feel free to play around with the add-ins. I’ve also added citrus peel into the mix with great results.

 

4 cups/1 pound/ 450 g chopped rhubarb

1 cup + 1 tablespoon/ 8 ounces/ 230 g sugar

2 cups/ 1 pound/ 450 grams water

1 vanilla bean (optional)

1 cinnamon stick

3-5 cardamom pods, lightly crushed

1/4 teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg

 

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly so the mixture continues to boil gently. Boil for 15 minutes or until the mixture is reduced by nearly half. The rhubarb will break down and the liquid will get syrupy. Remove the pan from the heat and let the syrup cool.

When cool, strain out the rhubarb. Save the rhubarb mash to add to yogurt, on top of ice cream or oatmeal.

Rhubarb syrup will keep covered in the fridge for two weeks.

 

For the float

These measurements are rough as it’s all a matter of taste. Adjust how you’d like. I kept on meaning to muddle strawberries with the syrup before adding the club soda and ice cream but got too excited that I forgot. Perhaps you’ll remember. Or imagine using strawberry ice cream or even coconut sorbet. So many floats to be had.

1/8 – 1/4 cup rhubarb syrup (recipe above)

1/2 cup club soda

1 scoop vanilla ice cream

 

Add the syrup to a glass. To that add a scoop of ice cream and finish with club soda. Serve with a spoon and a straw.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (week of 1/8/2017)

Spinach:

Spinach is one of those handy vegetables that can be used raw or cooked. Used in salad, it’s a nice change from the norm. Try using thinly sliced green onions, cucumber, and apples from this week’s box in yours! For dressing, vinaigrettes go well with spinach. I like to mix balsamic vinegar with olive oil but just about any dressing will do. Spinach is used in cooking just as often as it is used fresh. It makes a great addition for scrambled eggs, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, pasta, or sauté. Some like to sauté it up in just a little olive oil and garlic and eat it like Popeye. I even enjoy adding a handful to my smoothies.

Celery:

Celery is a popular finger food as well as a flavorful addition to soups. Because of their shape, they are great for stuffing for a fun and flavorful snack. You can get pretty creative when it comes to what you put on them: Peanut butter is the first thing that comes to mind but you can stuff your celery with just about anything. Cream cheese makes a good filler, try it mixed with chopped nuts and raisins. Celery is also often used in salad. You can go sweet: using thinly sliced apples, pecans, raisins, yogurt or sour cream, honey and a pinch of cinnamon or make it savory with lettuce or spinach, finely chopped onion, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar, salt and pepper.

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or on salad. I like adding them to my soup. They add a freshness to Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle soup. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. Or, you can even grill them whole like spring onions and eat them all by themselves with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little

salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (week of 1/1/2017)

Baby Broccolini:

Broccolini is not a form of baby broccoli but actually a hybrid between broccoli and Chinese kale. It can be cooked much the same way as regular broccoli but is more tender and takes less maintenance. Simply cut off the ends (I like to take a good inch or two because the ends can be tough and chewy), and either bake in the oven or toss in a stir fry. Try sautéing along with chopped garlic in a about a tablespoon of olive oil. Like other vegetables, these are often blanched first, before adding to the frying pan. Do this by adding to boiling water and simmering for about two minute then drain and transfer to a bowl of ice water. Return your pan to the stove and sautee the garlic, then add the broccolini back in to reheat. To bake, toss in olive oil and spread evenly on a baking sheet. Bake at 425°F for 10-15 minutes until tender.

Kiwi:

Kiwi is most commonly eaten as is by cutting in half and spooning out the inside, but it can also make a great addition to breakfast food or dessert. They can be used in smoothies (try with bananas, yogurt and avocado), as a topping for granola and yogurt, or with dessert (I like topping meringue with a little whip and a slice of kiwi). Kiwi can also be added to ice water with mint and lemon for a refreshing drink.

Carnival Squash:

Carnival squash is a hybrid between sweet dumpling and acorn squash. Try roasting your halved carnival squash seasoned with a little butter and brown sugar. It tastes nutty and sweeter than butternut squash but not as dry in texture as kabocha squash. Carnival squash is at its best when roasted which really brings out its flavors, but it can also be steamed or pureed. The seeds can be roasted and eaten just like with other winter squashes. I like its small compact size, which makes it easy to cut through and is great for serving one or two people. They are also great to throw into stews, curries, soups, or even veggie chilis. Use them in any recipe calling for butternut or acorn squash.

Recipe: Carnival Squash with Apples and Thyme

Celeriac:

Celery root or celeriac is prized for it’s distinctive flavor which is somewhere between celery and parsley. Although cooked celery root is excellent in soups, stew, and other hot dishes, it can also be enjoyed raw, especially grated and tossed in salads. Raw celery root has an intense flavor that tends to dominate salads, so pair it with other strongly flavored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, beets, and apples. Before using celery root, peel and soak briefly in water with a little vinegar or lemon juice to prevent cut surfaces from darkening.

Recipe: Mashed Celeriac

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/25/16)

How to Eat your BOX

 

Bananas

It was not until recent years that I discovered the magic of frozen bananas! Peel, break them into pieces and place in a zip-lock bag and store them in the freezer. Next time you’re making a smoothie, use them instead of ice, add a dollop of nut butter, a couple of dates, almond milk and sip away! Reduce the amount of milk in your smoothie and you have instant soft-serve ice cream. Add cocoa powder and now you have chocolate soft-serve ice cream!

 

Red Bell Peppers

We eat red bell peppers almost every week (within season). We love them raw, stuffed and baked, or in stir fry’s. A household favorite, fried rice: 3-4 eggs scrambled (set aside), chop 1 red bell pepper, 1 onion and mushrooms or any veggies you have available. In a hot pan, add a splash of sesame oil along with your veggies and sauté for a few minutes until cooked. Then add cooked rice, eggs, salt, pepper and 1 tsp of honey (shhh… this is my secret!). Sprinkle with chopped green onions and serve!

 

Yellow Onions

Most of my dishes start with onions! Our go-to soup during the week is “Sopa a la Minuta” or what we call “The Soup”. My husband likes it so much, he learned how to make it himself! Sauté 1 finely chopped onion in a little bit of olive oil until golden brown. Add 2 cloves minced garlic. Add 1 ground meat of your choice and cook until brown. Add 1.5 cups of diced tomatoes. 2 tbs oregano, and cook until tomato turns darker in color. Add salt and pepper. Taste. Add 6 cups beef broth and 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Add 2 diced potatoes. Boil until potatoes are tender. Rectify seasoning and dinner is ready!

 

With love and gratitude,

Sara Balcazar-Greene (aka. Peruvian Chick)

Peruvian Food Ambassador

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/18/16)

How to Eat your BOX

Yams:

If it were up to me I would put yams/sweet potatoes in the boxes every week! 😉 They make one of my all-time favorite snacks and are also a great side for any meal. I like to slice them into quarter inch rounds or strips (a mandolin comes in handy here), toss them in a little olive oil and any desired seasoning (sage, rosemary, and thyme are great with yams) and bake at 400° for about 30 minutes, until tender. You can also bake them whole. Make sure to thoroughly clean first and pat dry. Prick with a fork and bake for about 40-60 minutes at 425°.

Beets:

Beets can be cooked just about any way you like. They are great boiled or baked, sautéed or stewed. Usually I cut them into bite size pieces to bake in the oven because I love roasted beets! Simply coat in olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 375° for about 35 minutes (try adding some parsley when they’re done). But they can just as easily be cooked in a frying pan along with other veggies. The beet greens are great sautéed as well so don’t throw them out! Try cooking the greens in a little olive oil with garlic, salt and pepper on medium heat until bright green. Don’t let cook them too long though or they’ll get ‘slimy.’ Check out this recipe for sweet potato and beet chips!

Pears:

Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with Gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Mushrooms:

Mushrooms are in a class all their own. Literally, they are quite distinct in nature and classified as their own kingdom, separate from plants and animals. But, they are packed with nutrients and make a great addition to a healthy diet. Mushrooms are good raw on salads or in an array of cooked dishes. You can dice them and sauté with onions as a base for scrambled eggs or stir fry or in soup. They also blend well with ground beef, enhancing the flavor and making the meat go farther. Great for tacos or in pasta.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetables! Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienne, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

Papayas:

Papayas are ready to eat when they take on a yellow/orange-y color and are slightly soft. Leave on the counter in paper bag for a few days to ripen. The skin looks like it is going bad when ripening, but don’t throw it because it looks bad. Opening a rough-looking papaya often reveals a perfectly good piece of fruit. Once ripe, store in the refrigerator but try to eat within day or two for best flavor. Unripe/green papaya can be eaten it green salads or cooked dishes. After washing this fruit, cut it lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and eat with a spoon. For a little extra zest, squeeze lemon or lime juice on top. Cut papaya into smaller pieces for fruit salad or recipes, but first peel it with a paring knife. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out the fruit of a halved papaya. If you are adding it to a fruit salad, you should do so just before serving as it tends to cause the other fruit to become soft. (Thanks to all those good-for-you enzymes.)

While most people discard the big black seeds, they are actually edible and have a peppery flavor. They can be chewed whole or blended into a creamy salad dressing.

Try a mix of diced papaya, cilantro, jalapeno peppers and ginger together to make a unique salsa that goes great with shrimp, scallops and halibut.

Or try adding papaya to your smoothie. Combine with strawberries and or other fruit and yogurt in a blender. The papaya gives it a wonderfully creamy texture.

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How to EAT Your BOX! (Week of 12/11/16)

Broccoli:

Broccoli is such an easy vegetable to use. It’s great on salad, in stir-fry and soup, or served by itself as a side dish. We always boiled our broccoli and served it with a little butter and salt. Nowadays I like it best roasted to crispy perfection with garlic and other seasonings. The flavor of broccoli comes out well in the oven. Try tossing chopped broccoli florets with olive oil, salt and garlic slices. Bake at 450° for about 20 minutes, until edges are crispy and the stems are tender. Cutting the florets in half and laying them flat on the baking sheet results in a more caramelized effect. For extra flavor try drizzling with lemon juice or topping with Parmesan cheese.

Eggplant:

I’ve found that the oven is easiest to use when cooking this particular vegetable. Because eggplant soaks up oil like a sponge, cooking in a frying pan with oil can be difficult. Best to use a non-stick pan and cook at a higher heat. Try baking your eggplant separately and then adding it to whatever dish you’re making. Start by dicing your mostly peeled eggplant into bite size pieces. Toss with olive oil and cook on a baking sheet at 425° for about 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway through. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Serve as is or add to pasta, stir-fry, curry, on top of rice, etc)

Or, try making an eggplant tomato bake! Cut your peeled eggplant into ½ inch rounds, arrange on a baking sheet. Top each eggplant round with a slice of tomato. Drizzle with olive oil and season with oregano, salt, and pepper. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and bake at 375° until the cheese begins to brown, about 30-40 minutes. Switch oven to broil and bake for another 5 minutes.

Leeks:

Besides potato leek soup, there are plenty of ways to eat leeks. Used as an onion substitute it makes a great base in just about anything. Cook in a little oil until tender as a base for a sauce, sauté, scrambled eggs, soup, etc. The flavor is milder than an onion so I don’t mind having larger chunks. I like to cut them into quarter inch rounds.

Delicata Squash:

This is one of my favorite winter squash. First because it’s so delicious and Second because it’s so easy to prepare! All you have do is cut it in half and throw in the oven. You don’t even need to worry about the skins. Because they are tender enough, you can eat them right along with the flesh. They are also a much easier squash to cut than their larger counterparts so you don’t have to feel like you’re going to skewer yourself trying to slice the thing open. There are many ways to cook and use this squash: they can be baked, steamed, grilled or sautéed. They make a great side to almost any dish or can be added to pasta, salad, sauté, or stuffed. You can also add the creamy flesh to soup which makes for a thick smooth texture (and a wonderful nutty flavor!). My sister recently steamed up some delicata and added it to tomato soup as the base for her vegetable soup. It was a match made in heaven! It added a wonderful thick creamy texture and the flavor was fantastic.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/4/16)

Baby Bok Choy:

This Asian vegetable is in a class all on its own. It has a delicate and almost foam like texture and can be quite versatile. Try sautéing in a little olive oil and freshly minced garlic. To add more flavor you can use a combination of lemon and tarragon, or try soy sauce, sesame oil or coconut aminos, sesame seeds and ginger for an Asian spin. Roasting is also a great way to cook bok choy. Look up recipes online or check out the links here and here.

Cauliflower:

There are so many ways to use this vegetable I don’t even know where to start. They can be chopped up and added to salad or soup, roasted in the oven, tossed in a stir fry, boiled and pureed as a stand-in for mashed potatoes or to make a creamy soup, baked into a pizza crust as a flourless alternative, or simply eaten raw. The options are endless! You don’t even have to cut it up. Try baking it whole by simply cutting off the leaves and stem so it can sit upright, baste in olive oil, salt and spices of your choice, and bake on a cookie sheet or cast iron skillet at 450° for about 45-60 minutes or until a knife can be inserted easily. Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower goes well in spicy dishes or curries as it soaks up all the other flavors. Here’s a source for recipes.

Celery:

I still remember making ants on a log at grandma’s house. Whoever came up with celery sticks filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins is a might more creative than I. Nowadays my favorite way to eat celery is in chicken soup. Chicken and celery were just meant to be together. There’s something about that flavor combo that touches the soul. Try using your celery along with onion, cilantro and cauliflower from this week’s box to make chicken soup!

Cabbage:

What can I say? Cabbage is just a great thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my just about anything. I like to cut mine into little cabbage “shavings”. First cut the cabbage in half, then simply shave off slivers from along the inside edge. I rarely ever use a whole cabbage in one sitting so to keep the cut edges from drying out I make sure to store sealed in a plastic bag or plastic wrap.

Mangos:

Mangos are one of my all-time favorite fruits. They have a unique flavor and creamy texture unlike any other fruit. They also pair well in cooked savory dishes. Mango fried rice is simply amazing. Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or salsa. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated or made into fruit leather. You can order a whole case and dehydrate them or try freezing to use in smoothies.

Turnips:

Northwest box Only This time of year our NW box comes well stocked in root vegetables. This hearty box is a great way to

experience locally grown food all year round. The turnip reminds me of a mix between a potato and a radish….and maybe a beet. It can be cooked much the same way as a potato, you can even boil them until tender and make mashed turnips! They can be roasted, sautéed, added to soup or even sliced up and eaten raw with a little salt and lemon juice. To season try adding a combo of salt, pepper, and lemon or when baking, toss in coconut oil, salt, pepper, ginger and drizzled in honey(roast at 400° until tender), or mashed you can top with butter, salt, pepper, chives and Parmesan.