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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/12/18)

Bartlett Pears

These are easy to tell when ripe because they brighten in color (turn from green to yellow in tone) and have a wonderful fragrance. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Beets

If you don’t have time to roast or boil beets you can shorten the cook time dramatically by slicing off thin rounds and either sautéing, steaming, or boiling them, just peel them first with a vegetable peeler.

In the cooking world, beets are often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin” for their incredible range of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Although beets can be cooked in a variety of ways (including as a secret ingredient for deep dark chocolate cake-Google it!), roasting beets is one of the easiest and most delicious. Roasting beets intensifies their flavor, brings out their earthy sweetness, and makes their skin tender and easy to peel off. Roasted beets are particularly delicious in beet salads or just as a complementing side dish.

Kale

We love Apple Kale Salad: (Kale, Apple, Pear, Red Bell Pepper, Green onion, Carrot….)

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. Here are a few tips that have helped me. First make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered.

For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

Broccoli:

Pass the broccoli! Broccoli contains plant compounds which protect against cancer. Broccoli is great in salad, stir-fry, soup, roasted, steamed, or raw with your favorite veggie dip. Add Broccoli to your next box of good food delivery here.

Featured Recipe: Roasted Broccoli

The high heat with this method causes the broccoli to caramelize making this one of the tastiest ways to prepare and eat broccoli. Leave off the pecorino for a vegan option (try topping with a drizzle of tahini instead). Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

1 and ½ pounds broccoli crowns (roughly 2 heads)

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

4 garlic cloves, pressed

large pinch of dried red pepper flakes

½ teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons raw, sliced almonds (with or without skin)

2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 – 3 tablespoons freshly grated aged pecorino cheese (leave out for vegan option)

zest of half a lemon

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees Fahrenheit. If you prefer less crispy florets (or if your oven runs hot), you can reduce the oven temperature by 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit and adjust cooking time as necessary.

Line a sheet pan with parchment. Trim any dry, tough ends of the broccoli crowns, leaving roughly 2-inches of stalk attached. Slice the broccoli into ½-inch-thick steaks, starting in the center of each broccoli crown and working out to the edges, reserving any small or medium florets that fall off for roasting. Slice any large remaining florets in half lengthwise.

In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, pressed garlic, and red pepper flakes. Add the broccoli steaks and toss gently until evenly coated. Arrange the broccoli, cut-side down, on the lined sheet pan, setting them apart slightly. Sprinkle with salt.

Roast the broccoli for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, flip the broccoli, and sprinkle the almond slices evenly across the sheet pan. Roast for an additional 8 to 10 minutes, or until the broccoli is evenly caramelized and fork tender, and the almond slices are toasted and golden.

Transfer the broccoli to a platter, toss gently with the lemon juice and top with the grated pecorino cheese. Garnish with fresh lemon zest. Serve hot or at room temperature (it also tastes great cold). Leftover broccoli can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 days.

 

Recipe adapted from abeautifulplate.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 4/22/18)

Kale:

As a salad, kale keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter (it gets bitter as it ages, so plan to eat within 5 days).

Tips for making a tasty kale salad: make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered.

For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

Radicchio:

You can add to a mixed salad (see recipe below) or opt to savor them alone with the simplest of olive-oil dressings. Or, you can cook radicchio; the tonic bitterness is a good contrast to rich or fatty flavors. Radicchio is good braised, grilled, or in a soup. Store: keep radicchio in a tightly sealed bag in the refrigerator for up to one week.

 

Featured Recipe: Spring Pea, Asparagus, Kale & Quinoa Salad w/Kale Pesto

Finding asparagus and peas in your box of good is a sure sign that it is spring. “The pesto really takes it to the next level and this recipe makes about twice what you will need so feel free to enjoy the next day on your avo toast, breakfast salad w/ fried eggs or on pasta. Mmm all so good.” —caraskitchen.net

 

Ingredients:

FOR THE PESTO

4-6 leaves kale, de-stemmed, chopped

1/4 Cup walnuts or pine nuts

2 garlic cloves

1/4 Cup extra virgin olive oil, more for smoother pesto

1 medium lemon, juiced and zested

1/4 Cup cilantro, leaves and stems

Pinches salt & pepper, to taste

FOR THE SALAD

1 Cup (heaping) asparagus chopped in 1-inch pieces

3/4 Cups green peas, fresh or frozen

1/4 Cup mini bell peppers, thinly sliced on an angle

4 Cups salad greens (kale, red leaf lettuce, radicchio)

3 Cups cooked quinoa, rice, or pasta

1/4 Cup cilantro chopped (any fresh spring herb will work like basil or mint)

1 medium lemon, juiced and zested

2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 Teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/2 avocado, cut in cubes

Chopped cilantro to garnish

Instructions:

Make the pesto: De-stem kale and put everything into a food processor. Pulse for about 30 seconds. scrap down the sides and continue to pulse 30 more seconds. Scrape down sides again and then turn on high until desired consistency is reached.

Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Create and ice bath with ice cubes and water, set aside.

Chop asparagus into 1-inch pieces, measure out 1 heaping cup full. Once water is boiling add in the peas and asparagus and blanch. Cook for 2-3 minutes, and once bright green transfer to ice bath using a slotted spoon.

In a large bowl combine your salad greens, lemon zest and juice, oil, quinoa, peppers, red pepper, salt and pepper to taste if desired and toss to evenly coat.

Add in asparagus, peas, avocado cubes and a couple big dollops of pesto. Divide amongst plates. This would be great with fried eggs, salmon or baked tofu.

 

Adapted from recipe by caraskitchen.net

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/5/17)

Kale:

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it can be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. To prevent that, first, make sure to make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry or soup stock!); chop the leaves small; sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and ensures it’s evenly covered. For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne (or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/27/17)

Bartlett Pears:
Try adding them to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s red leaf lettuce. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about 1/8 cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts). Pro tip: The skin of Bartlett pears brightens as it ripens. Bartlett pears are ripe and ready to eat once they change from green to yellow in color. Refrigerate after pears are ripe.
Kale:
Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. For prep: rinse well upon opening your box, de-stem, and you have it ready for the week! (The stems make a great addition to a stir-fry, or soup stock – don’t toss them!); For a fresh salad: chop the leaves small, sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness, “tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute). Lastly, massage in your olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it is evenly covered. Try topping your salad with fresh apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries are also a great addition!

 

 

Kale and Roasted Potato Salad
Hearty roasted potatoes, caramelized shallots and wilted kale makes this salad delicious and satisfying!

Ingredients:
6 cups cubed yellow potatoes (about 1″ cubes)
3 cloves crushed garlic
1 large bunch of kale
2-3 carrots, sliced into 1” pieces
3 large shallots, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons grape seed oil
3 tablespoons whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons high quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2-3 tablespoons white wine vinegar, to taste
sea salt
black pepper
Instructions:
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Combine potatoes, carrots, grape seed oil, 1 teaspoon of sea salt and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper in a large mixing bowl until veggies are coated and seasoned.
3. Spread coated veggies on baking sheet and cook for 45-50 minutes, turning once or twice to brown evenly. Potatoes are done when browned and crispy.
4. Combine whole grain mustard, extra virgin olive oil, and 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar in a small bowl. Taste and add additional vinegar if desired. Set aside.
5. Caramelize shallots by cooking with 1 1/2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil over medium-low heat, for 15-20 minutes or until they’re browned.
6. Prep kale by thoroughly rinsing, chopping off the rough part of the stems and discarding. Slice the kale into 1-2″ strips.
7. When potatoes and carrots are nearly done roasting add garlic and kale to the onions and sauté over medium-low heat. Cook until the kale is thoroughly wilted, stirring often.
8. Combine kale and potatoes in a large serving bowl. Toss in vinaigrette or serve on the side as preferred (this recipe makes more than enough vinaigrette, so dress the salad to your taste). Add additional sea salt to preference. Serve immediately. Enjoy!

Adapted from ahouseinthehills.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of July 9, 2017)

Garlic Scapes:

You can use Scapes just like you would garlic; their flavor is milder, so you get the nice garlic taste without some of the bite. Use them on top of pizza, in pasta, in salsas, and as a replacement for garlic in most other recipes. There are many things you can do with scapes, but my personal preference is to turn them into garlic scape pesto. It’s a sharper, greener take on traditional basil pesto that can be used to add a fresh garlicky zing to just about anything – Spoon it into soups, spread it on sandwiches, toss with cooked pasta, beat it into scrambled eggs, and (best of all) slather it onto pizza dough before adding on the toppings. It freezes beautifully, too, so it’s easy to make an extra-large batch to tide you over until next spring.

Kale:

Apple Kale Salad: (Kale, Apple, Pear, Red Bell Pepper, Green onion, Carrot….) Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. Here are a few tips that have helped me. First make sure to make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered. For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

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Kale Power

I wish I could tell you that I’ve always liked kale. The healthy-leafy-green vegetable that now seems to be everywhere from smoothie bars to every menu across America.

For the first 30+ years of my life, I didn’t know kale existed. My introduction came about five years ago, when I started to juice, the flavor was “grassy” almost “metallic” like, I just couldn’t take it. I wanted to like it. But it caught me off guard. Kale was not part of my grocery list.

But when you love to eat, and the latest food trend catches up with you, it is almost impossible to avoid this grassy green. So I started to try it in different dishes. I would cook it, use it raw, puree it, and now… I can’t get enough of it.

One of my favorite restaurants in Washington State serves it simply sautéed in olive oil with garlic, golden raisins and pine nuts. That’s it! So simple, it’s impossible not to like it. Now, I feel somehow responsible to defend kale, the misunderstood child of the vegetable family. With its thick, curly leaves, it can easily seem intimidating, as though you’d have to wrestle it into submission before it agrees to be cooked.

Around the United States, everyone is talking about kale. So what’s all the kale hype about? Flavor aside, I love kale for three fundamental reasons: Kale tops the charts of nutrient density, possesses incredible culinary flexibility, and is easy to grow almost anywhere, which means you can enjoy local kale just about anywhere when it’s in season. I recently learned about its power to support brain health, and will be sharing that with you on the Klesick Farms blog.

As explained by doctor Drew Ramsey, author of Happiness Diet, the power of phytonutrients do amazing things. 

Sulforaphane

Sulforaphane is one of the reasons that cruciferous vegetables like kale and broccoli are on everyone’s “superfoods” list. Its antioxidant action helps fight high blood pressure, while its ability to stimulate natural detoxifying enzymes reduces brain inflammation as well as the risk of breast and prostate cancer. These protective effects may also be responsible for the observation that sulforaphane helps improve learning and memory abilities following brain injury. It can kill the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, which is responsible for stomach ulcers and gastric cancer risk.

Alpha-linolenic Acid (ALA)

ALA is an omega-3 fat found mainly in plants. It is an essential fatty acid, meaning your body can’t produce it and you must obtain it through your diet. Plants use this fat to convert sunlight into energy, making it vital to our planet’s energy production. In the brain, ALA is converted to the longer omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, which are particularly important for brain and heart health. Higher intakes of ALA are linked to a lower risk of depression and may decrease anxiety and the effects of stress.

Folates

Plant-based diets are key to brain health, and one reason are folates. At least eight forms of these water-soluble B-complex vitamins exist in food. Folic acid is the synthetic version. Folates, also known as vitamin B9, are needed for a healthy brain and good moods as they keep brain cells healthy, ward off heart disease (drastic risk reductions), and even fight cancer.

So what are your thoughts on Kale? What is your favorite way to enjoy this leafy vegetable?

Sara Balcazar-Greene (aka. Peruvian Chick)
Peruvian Food Ambassador
peruvianchick.com
instagram.com/peruvianchick
facebook.com/theperuvianchick

 

 

Kale, Apple and Parmesan Cheese Salad with Roasted Garlic-Lemon Dressing

 

Ingredients

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 bunch kale, ribs removed, thinly sliced

1 apple

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Preparation

Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil and salt in a large bowl. Add the kale, toss to coat and let stand 10 minutes.

 

While the kale stands, cut the apples into thin matchsticks. Add the apples and cheese to the kale. Season with salt and pepper and toss well.

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Kale Raab Salad with Chickpeas and Ricotta

CRISPY KALE RAAB, CHICKPEA, AND RICOTTA SALAD

Ingredients                                                                                                                         Serves 4

1 bag of kale raab, rinsed and trimmed

1 15 ounce can of chickpeas, drained or equivalent amount of cooked chickpeas (available in our grocery section)

2 cloves garlic, sliced

3 tablespoons of good quality olive oil, plus more for drizzling

sea salt

1 cup of fresh ricotta or soft goat cheese

red pepper flakes

2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice

handful of fresh mint, finely chopped (optional)

 

Instructions

  1. Preheat your broiler. Combine the raab kale mix, chickpeas, and garlic with oil in a large bowl. Season with salt and toss to coat.
  2. Transfer to a foil-lined baking sheet and broil for about two minutes, taking care to flip the broccolini once. Broil for another two minutes.
  3. Divide among plates and top with fresh ricotta. Season with red pepper flakes (to taste) and more sea salt.
  4. Drizzle with a bit of lemon juice and olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh chopped mint. Serve with toast.

BRAISING KALE RAAB

Many people do not know that kale raab is fit to eat, let alone delicious, but it’s actually sweeter and more delicate than actual kale leaves. The small, yellow flower bud clusters that pop up when kale crops are about to go to seed are known as kale raab, or kale rabe. This little-used treat makes for an impressive ingredient, but is surprisingly easy to prepare. Quick cooking will highlight the fragrant, clean taste of your kale raab.

Store: Store just like you would kale, unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Prep: If the stems are tender (test by snapping one off with your fingers) you can use the whole bunch. You may wish to remove the outer stems and just use the sweet inner stems and leaves.

Use: Kale Raab can be used in substitution for kale in many recipes. It it fantastic lightly steamed, sautéed, as well as blanched!

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How To Keep Your Greens Fresh

The key to keeping greens fresh is to pre-wash, dry and store them. Try to wash your greens the same day that yourbox of good is delivered. Try to make sure when you’re unpacking your box to set the lettuce and any other greens on the kitchen counter, so you don’t forget to wash them.

First off, fill a large bowl with some cold water and swirl the leaves around to get rid of the excess dirt. When washing kale, de-stem it as you’re washing it. That will save you time when it comes to throwing that kale salad together. Place in salad spinner, give the spinner a whirl, and spin until your greens are dry.

Spread two paper towels (still connected) on your counter and pile the dry lettuce/kale/spinach/other leaves on one end. Wrap the paper towel around your greens and then add some more leaves and continue the process until all the greens are wrapped up.  Make sure to wrap the leaves up gently but tightly, a lot like you would a sleeping bag.

Place the wrapped lettuce inside sealed plastic bags and store in your crisper drawer. The lettuce should stay good for about a week to two weeks.  Honestly, you should never keep those greens around for more than a week anyway.

Now that you have some freshly washed greens, you can make some amazing salads on the fly. Here’s to eating more greens!

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Grace & Gratitude in the Seasons of Life

There are seasons in life where the days keep pressing forward and you find yourself struggling to keep up. Perhaps it’s just me who sometimes feels angered for the consistency of the daily routine’s ability to not quit. I kindly ask it to stop so I can catch up, breathe or just take a break for a moment, but life continues and I go through the motions waiting for this season to pass and welcome another, where I live fully engaged and quite possibly one step ahead of our day. 

There are days, many in fact, where I simply don’t feel like doing the things life asks of me. A sink lays crowded with yet another round of dishes, the laundry must be done before the pile topples and swallows one of the children and dinner must be served whether I’m inclined to prepare it or not. But I press in and take it, dirty dish by dirty dish, one load after the other. And I prepare a simple dinner that nourishes even when I’m feeling emotionally malnourished and simply exhausted.
 
If I allow it, these seasons don’t pass without lessons to be learned. In the midst of my routine that refuses to quit, rather than lament it and be bothered by it, I overwhelm it with my thankfulness. Finding joy in life’s daily struggles is a job that requires a lot of you, but the reward is a changed attitude and a new perspective on these otherwise mundane tasks. 
I’m thankful for those dirty dishes, for they signify the blessing of food and of a meal shared together. The laundry overwhelms, but it’s piled high with taekwondo uniforms, grass-stained jeans and jam-stained dresses that inform of healthy bodies and a well-played day.
 
What I’ve also learned is to give myself grace in those days that overwhelm—even in the kitchen. As summer approaches, it really is the perfect time to be a bit of a lazy cook. In this season of continuous bounty, much of the work is done for you by the soil, sun and the farmer. With fresh produce, there is very little action needed on our part to put together an incredibly satisfying meal. 
 
Shaved raw corn tossed with fresh tomatoes, olive oil and salt—perhaps some fresh herbs too if they are around—makes a perfect side salad or a meal if tossed with pasta. Any number of vegetables can be shaved with a vegetable peeler and turned into a quick salad with a simple vinaigrette and perhaps a bit of cheese. I do this all the time with asparagus, carrots and zucchini. 
 
In my recipe (below), a lime-spiked vinaigrette both flavors and tenderizes dark kale. Dinner is ready in no time, as very little cooking is needed to throw together this tostada. Yet, it satisfies both nutritionally and just by the sheer fact that it tastes so fresh and delicious, leaving you with so much to be thankful for. 
 

Photo Credit: notwithoutsalt.com

Jalapeno & Lime Marinated Kale Tostada

Serves 2 very hungry people or 4 less hungry onesith the aid of our juicer and this recipe we’ve been going through kale faster than we can remove those hearty stems. After a lazy soak in lime juice and spice the kale surrenders a bit of its heft while retaining a freshness that is so often lacking in food this time of year.

If you don’t care about skimping on some calories and mess you can fry the tortillas in a shallow pan and a bit of oil around 360°F until golden brown. Or you could also use a small pile of tortilla chips as the base making this recipe even simpler.

Tortillas

Brush 4 tortillas with butter or olive oil, sprinkle with salt, then bake at 400°F for 10-12 minutes or until completely crisp.

Kale Marinade

¼ cup fresh lime juice

2 T olive oil

½ jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped

¼ cup cilantro

¼ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground cumin

4 cups kale, washed, thick ribs removed and roughly chopped

Mix first 6 ingredients in a large bowl. Add the chopped kale and toss to coat. Let sit for 30 minutes.

 

Black Beans

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves

1 T shallot, finely chopped

1 can black beans, rinsed and drained

Sauté garlic and shallots in oil over medium heat until just fragrant. Add beans and simmer about 5-7 minutes, until soft and warmed through.

Place baked tortilla on plate, top with warm beans, marinated kale, chunks of avocado and about 1 Tablespoon crumbled Cotija cheese.

 
by Ashley Rodriguez
 
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Fresh This Week Tips 1.18.11

Broccolini

Actually a cross between a broccoli and a Chinese broccoli (gai-lan/kai-lan).

STORE: Treat Broccolini much like you would broccoli, storing unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator up to 5 days.

PREP: Wash just before us, trim just the ends off if using stems, or trim stems off completely if using raw.

USE: Like most vegetables, they are best when cooked to just to al dente. They will be bright green and still retain a nice snap, especially in the stems. It’s always better in terms of retaining the nutrients anyway. You can use Broccolini in almost any recipe you’d use broccoli in or gai-lan in, but we feel like it’s a shame to cut them up. They’re long and elegant, making a beautiful presentation whole. Simply roast them with a little olive oil, sliced garlic, and sea salt. They are a fantastic side on any plate.

Photos & Tips from: http://www.foodmayhem.com/2010/06/broccolini.html

Zucchini

STORE: Store zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper drawer four to five days and do not wash until just before you are ready to use it.

USE: A component of ratatouille, zucchini is also good grilled, roasted, steamed, pan-fried, or raw. It also adds a boost to sweet breads and muffins. Zucchini is so versatile! If you haven’t “tried it all” with zucchini, do something different this week and try a new way of preparing them, just for fun!

Image from flickr.com

Kale

STORE: Keep kale unwashed (moisture speeds decay) in a plastic bag in the coldest section of the refrigerator, usually at the back. Because kale contains a lot of water, it doesn’t last long. Use it within 3 days of purchase for the tastiest results. Kale that has been sitting around can develop a strong bitter flavor.

PREP: If the center stalks are thicker than a pencil, remove and discard them before cooking.

USE: Kale is delicious sautéed, in soups, or prepared any way you’d cook spinach.

Image from flickr.com