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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 3/4/2018)

Portabello Mushrooms:

Did you know a single Portabella can contain more potassium than a banana? They’re versatile in the kitchen, too. Flip the caps over, place in a baking dish, drizzle on some olive oil, stuff with veggies (try spinach and tomatoes, with mozzarella for a spin on caprice) or cooked grains such as quinoa and bake until tender about 20 minutes at 425F. You can also slice them up and added to salad or cooked in a skillet with some onion and garlic as a yummy sautéed topping for a breakfast, lunch or dinner plate. Portabellos are a great substitute in recipes calling for steak. Seriously, ask one of your Vegan friends. ? So, get out there and eat some fungus already!

Asparagus:

Asparagus is best cooked as fresh as possible but if you need to store it for 3 to 4 days treat it like a bouquet of flowers. Trim a small amount from the bottoms of the stalks with a sharp knife and place them in a tall glass with a little water in the bottom. Cover the top loosely with a plastic bag, and store in the refrigerator. This will keep the stalks firm and crisp until you are ready to cook them.

To prepare; the smallest spears will only need to have their very bottoms trimmed off before cooking. However, the bottom portions of larger asparagus spears can be chewy and woody; they will either need to be snapped off or peeled. To snap off the tough portion, simply grasp the stalk with both hands and bend the bottom portion until it breaks off. The asparagus will naturally break off at the point where the tender portion ends and the tough, stringy part begins.

Zucchini:

Zucchini is more often used as a cooking vegetable but is also be enjoyed raw. It makes a great addition to salad or veggie trays with dip. When sent through the spiralizer this vegetable makes a sort of noodle which is often used as a substitute in paleo diets in spaghetti or noodle soup. To cook, simply heat oil over medium heat (sauté a little onion or garlic before adding the zucchini if desired), add zucchini noodles and a pinch of salt. Cook for about 5 minutes, until slightly softened. If you don’t own a spiralizer you can use a vegetable peeler and make long, flat noodles instead of round ones.

Serve as the bed to your pasta sauce and meatballs or add to your favorite vegetable soup.

 

Featured Recipe:

Portabello Baked Eggs

Serves 4

Ingredients:

4 large Portabello mushrooms, stem removed, wiped clean

Olive oil spray

½ teaspoon garlic powder

4 medium eggs

2 tablespoons grated Parmesan or Pecorino cheese

4 tablespoons chopped parsley OR spinach ribbons for garnish

Salt & Pepper, to taste

 

Instructions:

Preheat broiler to high. Set oven rack in the middle of the oven. Line a baking sheet.

Spray the mushroom caps with olive oil cooking spray on both sides. Sprinkle evenly with kosher salt and pepper and ¼ teaspoon of the garlic powder. Broil 5 minutes on each side, or until just tender.

Remove mushrooms from oven. Drain any liquids. Switch oven from broil to bake, setting temperature to 400 degrees F.

Break an egg into each mushroom. Sprinkle with the cheese. Bake 15 minutes, until egg whites are cooked.

Sprinkle the eggs with the remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and ⅛ teaspoon pepper. Garnish with parsley or spinach and serve.                                                                                                                             

 

Adapted from recipe by healthyrecipesblogs.com

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How To Eat Your BOX! (Week of 4/2/17)

Kiwi:

Kiwi is most commonly eaten as is by cutting in half and spooning out the inside, but it can also make a great addition to breakfast food, salad or dessert. It can be used in smoothies (try with bananas and avocado), as a topping for granola and yogurt or cereal, or as a decorative and delicious addition to pie or meringue. It makes a great addition to fruit salad or even a green salad if you’re feeling adventurous. And since the weather is finally starting to warm up, kiwi makes for a refreshing drink when added to ice water with mint and/or a squeeze of lemon.

Mushrooms:

Did you know that there are over 10,000 species of mushroom in North America alone? Or, that mushrooms are more closely related to human DNA than plant DNA, and a single Portabella can contain more potassium than a banana? You can also boil wild mushrooms to make dye for clothing. They’re simply amazing! Mushrooms can be sliced up and added to salad or cooked in a skillet with some onion and garlic as a yummy sautéed topping for a breakfast, lunch or dinner plate. So, get out there and eat some fungus already!

Daikon:

Daikon is a white root vegetable often seen in Japanese and Chinese cuisine that resembles a carrot. However, unlike a carrot’s sweetness, daikon is spicy and tart, similar to a radish. Its pungent and sharp flavor can be enjoyed raw, pickled, or cooked. The white pigment in daikon is called anthoxanthin, which is an antioxidant that may lower cholesterol and blood pressure. In Asian cuisine, daikon is often eaten alongside meaty dishes, and is said to aid in digestion and breakdown of oil, fatty animal protein, and dairy. It can be eaten raw like you would a radish, sliced or grated into a salad, or baked, sautéed or grilled like any other root vegetable. Cooked daikon has a similar texture and flavor to turnips.

Featured Recipe: Roasted Daikon Radish, Carrots and Peppers

Ingredients:

daikon radishes (1-3 daikons), scrubbed and sliced into ¼-inch rounds

2-3 carrots, peeled and cut into ¼-inch rounds

1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced

½ onion, thinly sliced

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper, to taste

1/8 cup balsamic vinegar

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Combine the daikon, carrots, red peppers, onion and olive oil on a nonstick baking sheet. Season well with salt and pepper. Roast for 25-30 minutes, stirring once or twice until tender.

2. Drizzle the veggies with balsamic vinegar and return to the oven. Roast for an additional 5 minutes. Toss well and then transfer to a serving bowl.

3. Enjoy!

Recipe adapted from sarahscucinabella.com

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How To Eat Your BOX! (Week of 2/19/17)

D’Anjou Pears:

The d’Anjou is a truly all-purpose pear. They are juicy when ripe, and their subtle sweetness hints at a refreshing lemon-lime flavor. Their dense flesh holds up well in heated applications like baking, poaching, roasting, or grilling and they are delicious when sliced fresh in salads or eaten as an out-of-hand snack. The most important thing to know about d’Anjou pears is that they do not change color as they ripen, unlike Bartlett pears, whose skin color changes to yellow during ripening. Check the neck for ripeness by gently pressing your thumb near the stem end of the pear. When it gives slightly, the pear is ripe.

Mushrooms:

These edible fungi are great raw on salads but they are absolutely fabulous when sautéed. There really isn’t a better ingredient around that works just as well in a breakfast, lunch or dinner plate. To sauté, heat oil or butter in a skillet on medium high heat. Clean and slice mushrooms in half inch pieces. When oil is hot add them to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. I like to sauté mine with onion and or garlic. Season with salt pepper to taste.

Artichokes:

Artichokes can be steamed, boiled, baked or grilled. I’ve had to play around with these to find how I like to cook them best. Boiling them whole is fast and easy in the beginning but can be messier to prep afterwards while they’re hot and soft. Plus, I’m always impatient and don’t want to wait around for them to cool off. My preferred method is to get them all prepped first and then bake them. That way they’re ready to eat as soon as I take them out of the oven.

To prepare, first have a lemon handy. Cut about an inch off the stem and top of the artichoke. Then cut in half and remove the fuzzy part in the center with a spoon. Rub the cut side with a half a lemon, squeezing some juice into the fold and the middle. Drizzle with olive oil, trying to get it between the folds, sprinkle with salt, pepper and freshly minced garlic. Bake on a cookie sheet for about 25 minutes at 425°. Mayonnaise mixed with a little balsamic vinegar is commonly used for a dip, or try using some olive oil or salad dressing mixed with mustard and balsamic vinegar. Play around with it. Your pantry is the limit!

RECIPE

Fresh Spring Rolls

If you’ve had this fancy Thai appetizer before, you may be surprised how easy they are to make at home. Try it out and see what you think!

Ingredients: (Put whatever veggies you’d like in these)

½ cucumber, halved and thinly sliced

1 carrot, Julienned

1 avocado, sliced

½ bell pepper, thinly sliced

2 green onions, diced

Lettuce, cut small

Cilantro, chopped(optional)

Rice paper, 8+ inch rounds

A protein (I like using grilled chicken but seafood is often used here)

Dipping sauce:

Mix 1 part crunchy peanut butter with 2 parts hoisin sauce, or store bought Asian dipping sauce.

Directions:

Preparation: 20-30 min

1. Cut up all the veggies and put in bowls or separate piles for easy access.

2. Fill a large salad bowl with hot water from the faucet. Place a single piece of rice paper under the water for a couple seconds. As soon as it becomes soft and pliable (about 5 seconds) remove from the bowl and place on a smooth plastic cutting board.

3. Arrange some of each ingredient on the rice paper in a row close to the center.

4. Roll rice paper by folding the shorter piece over first then wrapping the top and bottom down ends down. Finish by rolling the remainder from the middle out, keeping as tight as possible. Repeat

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/18/16)

How to Eat your BOX

Yams:

If it were up to me I would put yams/sweet potatoes in the boxes every week! 😉 They make one of my all-time favorite snacks and are also a great side for any meal. I like to slice them into quarter inch rounds or strips (a mandolin comes in handy here), toss them in a little olive oil and any desired seasoning (sage, rosemary, and thyme are great with yams) and bake at 400° for about 30 minutes, until tender. You can also bake them whole. Make sure to thoroughly clean first and pat dry. Prick with a fork and bake for about 40-60 minutes at 425°.

Beets:

Beets can be cooked just about any way you like. They are great boiled or baked, sautéed or stewed. Usually I cut them into bite size pieces to bake in the oven because I love roasted beets! Simply coat in olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 375° for about 35 minutes (try adding some parsley when they’re done). But they can just as easily be cooked in a frying pan along with other veggies. The beet greens are great sautéed as well so don’t throw them out! Try cooking the greens in a little olive oil with garlic, salt and pepper on medium heat until bright green. Don’t let cook them too long though or they’ll get ‘slimy.’ Check out this recipe for sweet potato and beet chips!

Pears:

Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with Gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Mushrooms:

Mushrooms are in a class all their own. Literally, they are quite distinct in nature and classified as their own kingdom, separate from plants and animals. But, they are packed with nutrients and make a great addition to a healthy diet. Mushrooms are good raw on salads or in an array of cooked dishes. You can dice them and sauté with onions as a base for scrambled eggs or stir fry or in soup. They also blend well with ground beef, enhancing the flavor and making the meat go farther. Great for tacos or in pasta.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetables! Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienne, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

Papayas:

Papayas are ready to eat when they take on a yellow/orange-y color and are slightly soft. Leave on the counter in paper bag for a few days to ripen. The skin looks like it is going bad when ripening, but don’t throw it because it looks bad. Opening a rough-looking papaya often reveals a perfectly good piece of fruit. Once ripe, store in the refrigerator but try to eat within day or two for best flavor. Unripe/green papaya can be eaten it green salads or cooked dishes. After washing this fruit, cut it lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and eat with a spoon. For a little extra zest, squeeze lemon or lime juice on top. Cut papaya into smaller pieces for fruit salad or recipes, but first peel it with a paring knife. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out the fruit of a halved papaya. If you are adding it to a fruit salad, you should do so just before serving as it tends to cause the other fruit to become soft. (Thanks to all those good-for-you enzymes.)

While most people discard the big black seeds, they are actually edible and have a peppery flavor. They can be chewed whole or blended into a creamy salad dressing.

Try a mix of diced papaya, cilantro, jalapeno peppers and ginger together to make a unique salsa that goes great with shrimp, scallops and halibut.

Or try adding papaya to your smoothie. Combine with strawberries and or other fruit and yogurt in a blender. The papaya gives it a wonderfully creamy texture.