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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 10/15/17)

Asian Pears:

Crunchy, juicy, and sweet. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable.

Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne (or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips, and Broccoli

Prep time: 20, Cook time: 40, Ready in 60 minutes. Serves 6.

Ingredients:

 

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 medium carrots (about 3/4 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick circles

1 1/2 cups Broccoli cut into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces

4 cups potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

3 medium parsnips (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 cup sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon dried rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

  1. Grease an 11 by 17-inch baking sheet pan with extra-virgin olive oil. Place vegetables in baking sheet and add the dried herbs, salt and pepper. Toss well, evenly coating all the vegetables with the seasonings and oil. Add more oil if the vegetables seem dry.

 

  1. Spread the vegetables evenly on a large baking sheet. Place on middle rack in oven and bake for 35 to 40 minutes.

 

Recipe adapted from: giadzy.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (week of 1/8/2017)

Spinach:

Spinach is one of those handy vegetables that can be used raw or cooked. Used in salad, it’s a nice change from the norm. Try using thinly sliced green onions, cucumber, and apples from this week’s box in yours! For dressing, vinaigrettes go well with spinach. I like to mix balsamic vinegar with olive oil but just about any dressing will do. Spinach is used in cooking just as often as it is used fresh. It makes a great addition for scrambled eggs, sandwiches, tacos, wraps, pasta, or sauté. Some like to sauté it up in just a little olive oil and garlic and eat it like Popeye. I even enjoy adding a handful to my smoothies.

Celery:

Celery is a popular finger food as well as a flavorful addition to soups. Because of their shape, they are great for stuffing for a fun and flavorful snack. You can get pretty creative when it comes to what you put on them: Peanut butter is the first thing that comes to mind but you can stuff your celery with just about anything. Cream cheese makes a good filler, try it mixed with chopped nuts and raisins. Celery is also often used in salad. You can go sweet: using thinly sliced apples, pecans, raisins, yogurt or sour cream, honey and a pinch of cinnamon or make it savory with lettuce or spinach, finely chopped onion, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar, salt and pepper.

Green Onions:

Also known as scallions, green onions are milder than regular onions but add a nice pop of flavor and color to almost any dish. They are commonly used as a topping for baked potatoes or on salad. I like adding them to my soup. They add a freshness to Asian style soups like egg drop or ramen noodle soup. They are also a great addition to omelets or quiche. Or, you can even grill them whole like spring onions and eat them all by themselves with a little lemon, salt & pepper.

Green Beans:

Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable. Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little

salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 12/18/16)

How to Eat your BOX

Yams:

If it were up to me I would put yams/sweet potatoes in the boxes every week! 😉 They make one of my all-time favorite snacks and are also a great side for any meal. I like to slice them into quarter inch rounds or strips (a mandolin comes in handy here), toss them in a little olive oil and any desired seasoning (sage, rosemary, and thyme are great with yams) and bake at 400° for about 30 minutes, until tender. You can also bake them whole. Make sure to thoroughly clean first and pat dry. Prick with a fork and bake for about 40-60 minutes at 425°.

Beets:

Beets can be cooked just about any way you like. They are great boiled or baked, sautéed or stewed. Usually I cut them into bite size pieces to bake in the oven because I love roasted beets! Simply coat in olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and bake at 375° for about 35 minutes (try adding some parsley when they’re done). But they can just as easily be cooked in a frying pan along with other veggies. The beet greens are great sautéed as well so don’t throw them out! Try cooking the greens in a little olive oil with garlic, salt and pepper on medium heat until bright green. Don’t let cook them too long though or they’ll get ‘slimy.’ Check out this recipe for sweet potato and beet chips!

Pears:

Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with Gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Mushrooms:

Mushrooms are in a class all their own. Literally, they are quite distinct in nature and classified as their own kingdom, separate from plants and animals. But, they are packed with nutrients and make a great addition to a healthy diet. Mushrooms are good raw on salads or in an array of cooked dishes. You can dice them and sauté with onions as a base for scrambled eggs or stir fry or in soup. They also blend well with ground beef, enhancing the flavor and making the meat go farther. Great for tacos or in pasta.

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetables! Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienne, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne(or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

Papayas:

Papayas are ready to eat when they take on a yellow/orange-y color and are slightly soft. Leave on the counter in paper bag for a few days to ripen. The skin looks like it is going bad when ripening, but don’t throw it because it looks bad. Opening a rough-looking papaya often reveals a perfectly good piece of fruit. Once ripe, store in the refrigerator but try to eat within day or two for best flavor. Unripe/green papaya can be eaten it green salads or cooked dishes. After washing this fruit, cut it lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and eat with a spoon. For a little extra zest, squeeze lemon or lime juice on top. Cut papaya into smaller pieces for fruit salad or recipes, but first peel it with a paring knife. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out the fruit of a halved papaya. If you are adding it to a fruit salad, you should do so just before serving as it tends to cause the other fruit to become soft. (Thanks to all those good-for-you enzymes.)

While most people discard the big black seeds, they are actually edible and have a peppery flavor. They can be chewed whole or blended into a creamy salad dressing.

Try a mix of diced papaya, cilantro, jalapeno peppers and ginger together to make a unique salsa that goes great with shrimp, scallops and halibut.

Or try adding papaya to your smoothie. Combine with strawberries and or other fruit and yogurt in a blender. The papaya gives it a wonderfully creamy texture.

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Know Your Produce: Parsnips

Know Your Produce: Parsnips

Parsnips are sweet, succulent underground taproots closely related to (surprise!) the carrot family of vegetables.

Store: parsnips in a plastic bag and place inside the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator set between 0°C and 5°C. Do not place raw parsnips in the freezer compartment.

Prep: to prepare, wash them in cold water and scrub or gently peel the skin. Trim off the ends. Cut into cubes, disc, and pieces as you desire.

Tender parsnips can be cooked in a similar way like carrots. Do not overcook; they cook early as they contain more sugar than starch.

Use: Raw parsnips add unique sweet taste to salads, coleslaw, and toppings. Grate or very thinly slice when using raw.

Parsnips can be cooked and mashed with potato, leeks, cauliflower, etc.

Slices and cubes added to stews, soups, and stir-fries and served with poultry, fish, and meat.

Used in breads, pies, casseroles, cakes, etc., in a variety of savory dishes.

Try them: sliced and roasted with coconut oil and sea salt. Once you remove from the oven, sprinkle with cinnamon and then drizzle some raw honey on top. Serve and enjoy!

 

 

See the table below for in depth analysis of nutrients:Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa), Fresh, raw,
Nutrition value per 100 g.
(Source: USDA National Nutrient data base)

 

Principle Nutrient Value Percentage of RDA
Energy 75 Kcal 4%
Carbohydrates 17.99 g 14%
Protein 1.20 g 2%
Total Fat 0.30 g 1%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Dietary Fiber 4.9 g 13%
Vitamins
Folates 67 µg 17%
Niacin 0.700 mg 4%
Pantothenic acid 0.600 mg 12%
Pyridoxine 0.90 mg 7%
Riboflavin 0.050 mg 4%
Thiamin 0.090 mg 7.5%
Vitamin A 0 IU 0%
Vitamin C 17 mg 29%
Vitamin K 22.5 µg 19%
Electrolytes
Sodium 10 mg <1%
Potassium 375 mg 8%
Minerals
Calcium 36 mg 3.5%
Copper 0.120 mg 13%
Iron 0.59 mg 7.5%
Magnesium 29 mg 7%
Manganese 0.560 mg 24%
Phosphorus 71 mg 10%
Selenium 1.8 µg 3%
Zinc 0.59 mg 5%
Phyto-nutrients
Carotene-α 0 µg
Carotene-ß 0 µg
Crypto-xanthin-ß 0 µg
Lutein-zeaxanthin 0 µg
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Fresh This Week Tips, Week 11.28.10

Navel Oranges
STORE: Refrigerate for up to two weeks.
PREP:  Peel the orange and remove the white pith, if desired. To section the already peeled fruit, cut away the outer and inner skin to expose the pulp. Then, run a sharp knife along the sides of the dividing membranes to release the sections. Work over a bowl to catch the juices.
For juicing, halve the fruit with the skin on and use an orange juicer.
For orange zest, scrub the outside of the orange with hot water and use a hand grater or vegetable peeler to remove the zest.
USE: Eat your navels as a delicious snack served as wedges, but you can also incorporate them into beverages, vinaigrettes and salads as a sweet and colorful accent.
image from flickr.com

Zucchini
STORE: Keep unwashed zucchini in a plastic bag and place in a cool area or inside the refrigerator for up to one week.
PREP: Wash zucchini by gently rubbing them under cool water. Slice off both ends of the zucchini. Cut them into rounds, spears or half moons.
USE: Zucchini is a versatile veggie. It can be grilled, cooked with pasta, stuffed or baked into breads and muffins. Make a healthy stir fry with zucchini and other veggies from this week’s box. Add a touch of butter to a hot skillet and toss in cut zucchini and other veggies of your choice such as carrots, cabbage or even squash (cooked). Season your stir fry to taste. Remove from heat when veggies are still crisp, but tender.
image from myrecipes.com

Red Leaf Lettuce
STORE: Store red leaf lettuce in the crisper of your refrigerator inside a sealed plastic bag. Use within three to five days.
PREP:  Rinse thoroughly to remove dirt and dry the leaves with a paper towel or in a salad spinner. Chop or tear to your preference.
USE: Use chopped lettuce as a base for a salad or the crunch in a sandwich. You can also make some tasty free-range chicken or tofu lettuce wraps.
image from flickr.com

Radishes
STORE: Store radishes wrapped in plastic with the leaves and stems removed in the coldest part of your refrigerator for four to seven days. You can also store them in a tupperware container filled with cold water and they will keep for up to two weeks.
PREP: Rinse radishes under cold water and keep them whole or slice them depending on their purpose.
USE: Radishes are a great, healthy snack and can be used atop salads or sandwiches, in sautées or pickled. Radishes have a refreshing peppery flavor and unbeatable crunch!
image from fotobank.ru

Parsnips
STORE: Store unwashed parsnips in a cool dark place, just as you would carrots. Wrapped in a paper towel and placed in a plastic bag in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator, they should last up to 2 weeks, if not longer. Cooked parsnips may be refrigerated and used within 3 days.
PREP: Parsnips need to be peeled. For cooked parsnips, many prefer to boil or steam the washed root and then scrape off the tougher skin to preserve nutritional value.
USE: The parsnip looks like a white, overgrown carrot. It is sweet with a texture like a sweet potato and can be eaten raw or cooked. You may grate them raw in salads, but we think they are best when roasted in the oven, with carrots, or steamed and mashed like potatoes. If adding to soups, wait until the last 5-10 minutes of cooking time so the parsnips don’t become mushy from overcooking. You may also substitute parsnips in most recipes that call for carrots.
From: http://homecooking.about.com/od/howtocookvegetables/a/parsniptips.htm
image from foodnetwork.com

Kohlrabi
STORE: With the leaf stems removed, kohlrabi can be stored in the refrigerator for several weeks. Storage life can be extended if placed in sealed plastic bags.
PREP: Wash and peel kohlrabi before using. The bulb can be sliced, cut into quarters, cubes or julienne strips.
USE: These interesting little vegetables can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. You can roast, steam or bake them, add them to a salad or curry or even quick pickle them:http://www.restaurantwidow.com/2006/07/kohlrabi_and_wh.html.
image from theperfectbite.blogs.com