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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 8/19/18)

Apples:
Apples are one of those quintessential healthy eating choices! You can dice them up and throw them into your hot cereal with some cinnamon for a fresh take on breakfast, toss them in smoothies, slice them atop green salads to sweeten them up and add texture, dip them in nut butter or yogurt for a snack, roast with savory fall veggies, bake with a topping of your favorite granola…so many ways to enjoy them! And perhaps the best part? Antioxidants and phytochemicals in apples have been linked to help prevent a number of chronic diseases, including: Alzheimer’s, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes and more. Store unwashed apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Be sure to store separately. See healthline.com for more nutrition information on Apples!

Green Beans:
Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Frisée

You’ve no doubt seen frisée before, perhaps without realizing it, tucked away inside a mesclun baby greens mix. Also called curly endive, the curly, pale green leaves are frizzy in appearance. Frisée is a variety of chicory, as you’ll be clued in to with the first solo bite: it’s one of those bitters we were talking about in last week’s newsletter. Store: in the fridge for up to five days (rinse first), in plastic or other non-breathable material, so it doesn’t wilt. Use: most often served fresh in salads, try it wilted or sautéed to mellow its bitterness. Frisée pairs well with flavor-packed ingredients and fats: Dress leaves with a warm vinaigrette of roast-chicken pan drippings and sherry or red wine vinegar, toss in browned bits of thick-cut pancetta, ham, or steak bits, or top with a poached or fried egg.

 

Featured Recipe: Farmer’s Market Salad

This dish combines all of those wonderful summer veggies with a creamy, yet light, dressing that is full of flavor. This version has cooked chicken, but this salad can certainly be served on its own. Likewise, feel free to swap in your favorite vegan dressing if dairy isn’t in your diet. Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

2 medium (about 1 lb.) summer squashes (zucchini, yellow crookneck), sliced thin

1 bell pepper, sliced

2 cups tomatoes cut into 1-inch pieces

2 cups frisée, chopped

½ cup green onions, sliced

1 ear fresh corn, off the cob or 1 cup

6” length of cucumber, sliced

2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded or sliced, this would be 3/4 uncooked boneless chicken breast

DRESSING:

1/3 cup buttermilk

1/3 cup soy-free mayonnaise

1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon lime juice

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

If you are starting with uncooked boneless chicken breast, preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Brush the chicken with olive oil on both sides and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish and roast for 15-20 minutes until cooked though. The internal temperature should be 165 degrees.

Let cool and either slice into thin strips or shred with a fork.

In a large bowl combine the summer squash, bell pepper, tomatoes, frisée, green onions, corn, cucumber, and shredded chicken.

In a small bowl combine the buttermilk, mayonnaise, Greek yogurt, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the salad. Combine well. Serve at once.

 

Recipe adapted from anothertablespoon.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/12/18)

Bartlett Pears

These are easy to tell when ripe because they brighten in color (turn from green to yellow in tone) and have a wonderful fragrance. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad mix. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Beets

If you don’t have time to roast or boil beets you can shorten the cook time dramatically by slicing off thin rounds and either sautéing, steaming, or boiling them, just peel them first with a vegetable peeler.

In the cooking world, beets are often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin” for their incredible range of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Although beets can be cooked in a variety of ways (including as a secret ingredient for deep dark chocolate cake-Google it!), roasting beets is one of the easiest and most delicious. Roasting beets intensifies their flavor, brings out their earthy sweetness, and makes their skin tender and easy to peel off. Roasted beets are particularly delicious in beet salads or just as a complementing side dish.

Kale

We love Apple Kale Salad: (Kale, Apple, Pear, Red Bell Pepper, Green onion, Carrot….)

Kale is just wonderful and it’s so good for you! One great thing about kale as a salad is that it keeps well in the fridge, so you can make ahead of time and not worry about it wilting. Kale can be a little tricky because it tends to be a bit tough and sometimes bitter. Here are a few tips that have helped me. First make sure to remove all large ribs and stems (They make a great addition to a stir-fry though!); Chop the leaves small; Sprinkle with salt to cut the bitterness; “Tenderize” the leaves by massaging them with your hands (only takes about half a minute); And lastly, massage in the olive oil or salad dressing. This turns the kale bright green and makes it so it’s evenly covered.

For the dressing, I like to use a combination of vinegar and olive oil. Once you have prepped your kale and worked in the dressing, add your toppings. Try with apple or pear slices. Cashews, almonds and dried cranberries also taste great with this combination!

Broccoli:

Pass the broccoli! Broccoli contains plant compounds which protect against cancer. Broccoli is great in salad, stir-fry, soup, roasted, steamed, or raw with your favorite veggie dip. Add Broccoli to your next box of good food delivery here.

Featured Recipe: Roasted Broccoli

The high heat with this method causes the broccoli to caramelize making this one of the tastiest ways to prepare and eat broccoli. Leave off the pecorino for a vegan option (try topping with a drizzle of tahini instead). Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

1 and ½ pounds broccoli crowns (roughly 2 heads)

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

4 garlic cloves, pressed

large pinch of dried red pepper flakes

½ teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons raw, sliced almonds (with or without skin)

2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 – 3 tablespoons freshly grated aged pecorino cheese (leave out for vegan option)

zest of half a lemon

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees Fahrenheit. If you prefer less crispy florets (or if your oven runs hot), you can reduce the oven temperature by 10 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit and adjust cooking time as necessary.

Line a sheet pan with parchment. Trim any dry, tough ends of the broccoli crowns, leaving roughly 2-inches of stalk attached. Slice the broccoli into ½-inch-thick steaks, starting in the center of each broccoli crown and working out to the edges, reserving any small or medium florets that fall off for roasting. Slice any large remaining florets in half lengthwise.

In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, pressed garlic, and red pepper flakes. Add the broccoli steaks and toss gently until evenly coated. Arrange the broccoli, cut-side down, on the lined sheet pan, setting them apart slightly. Sprinkle with salt.

Roast the broccoli for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, flip the broccoli, and sprinkle the almond slices evenly across the sheet pan. Roast for an additional 8 to 10 minutes, or until the broccoli is evenly caramelized and fork tender, and the almond slices are toasted and golden.

Transfer the broccoli to a platter, toss gently with the lemon juice and top with the grated pecorino cheese. Garnish with fresh lemon zest. Serve hot or at room temperature (it also tastes great cold). Leftover broccoli can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 days.

 

Recipe adapted from abeautifulplate.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 8/5/18)

Melons, Cantaloupe      

Cantaloupe provide a range of antioxidants, phytonutrients, and electrolytes which have been shown to have multiple health benefits. Two types of powerful antioxidants in cantaloupe (carotenoids and cucurbitacins) have been linked with the prevention of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. They help to stop free radical damage within the body and slow the aging process. —dr.axe.dom

Storage and Eating: They may look hardy, but melons can perish quickly if not kept in the refrigerator. Keep ripe melons away from other fruit so that the ethylene gas that they produce does not speed up the fruit’s ripening. Uncut ripe melons should keep in the fridge for up to 5 days. You can also use a melon baller to scoop out ripe fruit and then freeze to add to smoothies.

Green Cabbage

Cabbage has the highest amount of some of the most powerful antioxidants found in cruciferous vegetables – phytonutrients such as thiocyanates, lutein, zeaxanthin, isothiocyanates, and sulforaphane, which stimulate detoxifying enzymes. Research has shown these compounds to protect against several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancers. They also help lower the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) or “bad cholesterol” levels in blood, which can build up in arteries and cause heart disease. —foodfacts.mercola.com

Eat it: Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. There are endless opportunities to use it up. You can add it to “just about anything” veggie-wise. Make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Featured Recipe: Cabbage Salad

This delicious, filling comes from the one by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. This combination of greens, seeds and currants will fill you up quickly and keep you full.

Ingredients:

3 ½ cups green cabbage, grated (approx. ½ cabbage)

1 carrot, peeled and grated

1 red pepper, thinly sliced

1/4 cup dried currants or cranberries

2 tbsp raw pumpkin seeds

2 tbsp raw sunflower seeds

1 tbsp unhulled sesame seeds

For dressing:

1/3 cup almond or hemp milk

1 apple, peeled and sliced

1/2 cup raw cashews

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Instructions:

Mix all salad ingredients together.

In a high-powered blender, blend almond/hemp milk, apple, cashews and vinegar and toss with salad.

Garnish with currants and lightly toasted sesame seeds.

Recipe adapted from Dr. Joel Fuhrman

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 7/1/18)

Red Cabbage

Cabbage is a handy thing to have around. Don’t let it be that vegetable that sits in the bottom of your refrigerator drawer for months on end. There are endless opportunities to use it up. I’m constantly pulling mine out and adding it to my “just about anything”. I like to make cabbage “shavings” by first cutting the cabbage in half, then simply shaving off pieces from along the edges. Also, if you’re like me and rarely use a whole cabbage in one sitting, keep the cut edges from drying out by rinsing and storing in a sealed plastic bag.

Good source of Thiamin, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese.

—nutritiondata.self.com

Berries

NW berries need to be treated a little gentler than their California counterparts. Always wait to wash until ready to eat, gently pat dry to avoid soggy berries, and try to eat within 3 days of delivery.

Sweet Onions

Sweet onions lack the sulfuric pungency of yellow onions. The best part? They won’t make you cry when you cut them up! This is also why they taste “sweet” – not because they have more sugar than regular onions, but because they lack the Sulphur. Sweet onions are best eaten fresh – cooking them wastes their delicate flavor and you won’t get the “onion-y” flavor that you want with a cooking onion. The mild flavor of these onions makes them perfect for your raw in salads and relishes or chopped as a garnish. If you do cook them, either roast them to caramelize their flavor or make homemade onion rings.

Sweet onions will keep for a week or two at room temperature. For longer storage keep them in an open paper bag in a cool, dark place. You can put them in the veggie drawer of a fridge in a paper bag or on layers of newspaper, but don’t keep them wrapped in plastic, since their juicy constitution makes them susceptible to rot and mold.

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Vegetable Protein Rice Bowl

Fiber-rich and full of protein. Serves 4

Ingredients

1 small head of red cabbage

1 large sweet potato

1 sweet onion

1 15-ounce can of chickpeas

4 handfuls of red leaf lettuce, rinsed and chopped

1 1/2 cups of rice

8 ounces 2% yogurt

1 handful of cilantro

1 lime

Olive oil

Spices for Veggies: Onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, cumin and some red chili flakes

Kosher salt

Optional: Feta Cheese

Instructions

Pre-heat your oven to 400F

Note: You can either chop and toss the sweet onions in with the veggies to roast, or, if you are fine with the crunch, serve them raw as a topping. For the veggies, cut the cabbage in 8 wedges. Cut large chunks of sweet potato so they cook around the same time. Cook for about 20 minutes or until al dente-tender. Meanwhile, drain the chickpeas and toss in some olive oil to coat and a couple shakes of the spices and a couple pinches of kosher salt. Throw on a lined baking pan and place in the oven (can bake at the same time as the veggies, but try for 10-15 minutes at 400F.

Meanwhile, cook the rice on stove top or in a rice cooker.

While veggies, chickpeas, and rice are cooking, make the cilantro yogurt sauce. Mix together the yogurt, cilantro, juice of the lime, shake of onion powder (or add in some fresh minced sweet onion!), garlic powder and some salt in a food processor or blender, blend, taste, adjust seasonings.

As soon as the veggies, chickpeas, and rice are done cooking, place everything in a bowl including the red leaf lettuce (optionally, you can mix everything else and dump on top the greens) and mix well, then cover for a few minutes, season with some salt and mix some more.

 

Recipe adapted from susanstable.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 5/6/18)

Daikon Radish-Purple:

Their crunchiness makes them especially good for pickling (think kimchi), but they are equally good cut up into matchsticks and served alongside carrots and broccoli to brighten up that veggie platter. Try it: thin slices atop your next homemade avocado toast.

 

Bunch Spinach:

The first thing I do when I bring spinach home is to wash it and lay it out on the counter to dry (or dry in a salad spinner). Don’t put it away sopping wet. This way it will last longer and be ready to use when needed. Another great way to keep spinach longer is to freeze it. If I’m not going to use it fresh, say in a salad, then frozen spinach can be used just as well in cooking or in a smoothie. I love having spinach in my freezer because I know I don’t have to worry about it and it’s always available when needed. When storing in the freezer make sure to wash it first and let dry. Also, cut off any roots and stems you wouldn’t eat and put in an air tight container vs. a bag. This will keep it from getting freezer burned and is also easier to grab and put away.

 

Peaches:

Ripen peaches in a paper bag at room temperature for 2 to 3 days. Unripe peaches can be stored at room temperature up to 5 days. Refrigerate ripe peaches in a sealed container up to one week. (Be sure that they are ripened first, as they will not ripen in the refrigerator.)

 

Featured Recipe: Daikon Radish Salad

Refreshing, crunchy, and slightly tangy, this Asian-inspired recipe is good and simple!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

 

1 Tbsp tamari or light soy sauce

1 Tbsp rice vinegar

1 Tbsp sesame oil

1 tsp honey or sugar

1 Tbsp black sesame seeds

1 Daikon

1 carrot

 

Instructions:

In a bowl, mix soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, honey and sesame seeds.

Peel and cut Daikon and carrot into very thin into match sticks.

Mix your veggies well with dressing. Enjoy!

Recipe adapted from www.foodfidelity.com

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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 4/8/18)

Savoy Cabbage:

These crinkled leaf cabbages are one of the best varieties for cooking and tender enough to be eaten raw in salads. A drawback of its tender nature is that it does not have the keeping quality of its sturdier cousins but should hold well in the fridge for about a week. Cook them like you would a regular cabbage; in soups, stir fries, or other cabbage recipe. Or, simply cut into one-inch strips and sauté in a large covered pan with some butter.

In China and other East Asian region, it is used like cabbage in stir fries with added onion, garlic, bell pepper and green chillies mixed with steamed rice and soy/chili/tomato sauce to prepare fried rice, egg rice noodles, chowmein…etc.

 

Leeks:

Leeks are cousins to the old, familiar onion, but have a sweeter, more delicate flavor reminiscent of garlic or chives and are delicious no matter how they’re cooked. Additionally, leeks contain generous amounts of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, making the vegetable a wise addition to a healthy diet. You can cook leeks by poaching them in chicken broth, pan-frying them in a little oil, or boiling them until tender, or you can include the leeks in a variety of other recipes (such as the one below).

 

 

Featured Recipe: Simple Shredded Savoy Cabbage

A simple shredded savoy supper or side dish that also pairs well with a protein such as roast chicken.

Prep Time: 5 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 10 minutes Serves 3-4

 

Ingredients:

Knob of unsalted butter or ghee

2.5 oz. pancetta (or other salty, savory protein)

1 small savoy cabbage, shredded

1 leek, white parts only, rinsed, medium dice

small glass white wine

Salt and pepper

Instructions:

Melt a knob of butter in a large frying pan over a medium heat until it foams. Add the pancetta and diced leeks and cook for 3-4 minutes until pancetta is lightly browned and leeks are starting to get tender.

Finely shred the cabbage and add it to the pan.

Turn the heat up high and pour in the wine. The cabbage will cook in 2 minutes whilst the wine bubbles and reduces. Be sure not to overcook the cabbage—make sure it retains its bright green color.

Season with pepper and a little salt (depending on the saltiness of the pancetta) and serve. this dish is wonderful on its own with a hunk of bread or as an accompaniment to a roast chicken.

 

Adapted from recipe by glutsandgluttony.com

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/19)

Rio Star Grapefruit

Not only are grapefruit high in fiber and low in calories, they contain bioflavonoids and other plant chemicals that protect us against serious diseases like cancer, heart disease, and the formation of tumors. But the sweet-tart juicy deliciousness that grapefruits bring to the table are reason enough to eat them! Also, grapefruit (especially organic with its fuller flavor) doesn’t need sugar. If you don’t like them halved and eaten with a spoon (the traditional method), try peeling them and eating like an orange. If you prefer a mellower flavor, peel, halve them vertically; slice crosswise into 3/4-inch-thick half-moons, lay on a baking sheet and sprinkle on some cinnamon. Broil them for about 15 minutes. This makes them taste “sweeter” without the sugar.

 

Easter Egg Radishes

Store radishes in the crisper in a perforated bag. If you’re planning on eating the tops, use within 2 days. If you don’t plan to use the tops, twist them off prior to refrigerating to extend the life of the radish bulbs to a week. Radishes are great fresh, poached, baked, or pickled.

To make pickled radishes (use as a relish or atop salads or in wraps or sandwiches): Combine cleaned radish bulbs (about 10), 2 cups white vinegar, 1 tsp peppercorns, 1 tsp Kosher salt, and 1 tsp sugar in a clean glass quart jar. Cover, label, shake well to dissolve and distribute salt & sugar, then refrigerate at least 3 days-1 week before serving (shake jar once a day for the first 3 days to keep things distributed inside. Keeps up to 3 months.

 

 

Garlic Roasted Potatoes

This is one of those go-to recipes that you’ll find yourself coming back to, because its super simple and super tasty!

Serves 4

 

Ingredients:

 

4 large russet potatoes

4 tbsps olive oil

1-2 tbsp garlic powder

2 tbsp parsley flakes (or use 3 tbsp fresh)

1 ½ tsps salt (or to taste)

1 tsp black pepper

 

Instructions:

1.            Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2.            Cut the potatoes into 1-inch cubes and toss into a bowl with the oil, garlic, parsley, salt, and pepper.

3.            Spread the potatoes on a prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-30 minutes.

4.            If necessary, flip over and bake for another 10-15 minutes. Serve.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 11/12/17)

How to EAT…

Celery Root (Celeriac):

Celery root or celeriac is prized for its distinctive flavor which is somewhere between celery and parsley. Although cooked celery root is excellent in soups, stew, and other hot dishes, it can also be enjoyed raw, especially grated and tossed in salads. Raw celery root has an intense flavor that tends to dominate salads, so pair it with other strongly flavored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, beets, and apples. Before using celery root, peel and soak briefly in water with a little vinegar or lemon juice to prevent cut surfaces from darkening.

 

Green Onions (Scallions):

Don’t be afraid to use the entire green onion! Green onions, also called scallions, make an excellent garnish to soups, salads, noodle or rice dishes.

STORE: Store green onions in a plastic bag in your crisper for five to seven days. Be sure to keep them away from fruits and veggies that absorb odors easily like mushrooms, corn and apples.

PREP: Rinse your green onions in cold water; trim off roots and the very tops of the greens. Dice into thin or slightly thicker rounds depending on your preference.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Cauliflower & Celery Root Soup

Makes 8 servings

 

INGREDIENTS

 

1 tablespoon olive oil

8 cups cauliflower florets with stems chopped into ½-inch pieces (1 large head)

4 cups chopped celery root (½-inch pieces), about 1 medium root

2 large carrots, peeled and diced into ½-inch pieces

1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced, or 1 red onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

8 cups organic vegetable or chicken broth

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste

½ teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground green cardamom

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 can (13.5 ounces) coconut milk

 

For Garnish: Breadfarm bread cubes (optional), peppers, finely chopped green onion or chives, lime wedges

 

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

2. Chop cauliflower, celery root, carrots, green onion and garlic. Place a heavy bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Drizzle in olive oil. When shimmering, add onions, and carrots. Cook for about 3 minutes, add garlic, and cook another 2 minutes, stirring often to keep garlic from burning. Toss in the cauliflower and celery root. Pour in broth; add your spices, and stir well. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes or until vegetables are fork tender.

 

3. Stir in the coconut milk. (Note: if you like your soups more brothy, you may opt to skip this step which makes the soup thicker and more like a chowder.) Remove half of the vegetables from pot. Use an immersion blender to puree the remaining soup in the pot. Alternately, add remaining soup to a blender, in batches, and blend until smooth. Return blended soup to pot along with reserved vegetables and stir well to combine. Taste soup for seasoning, adding more salt or pepper to taste. Divide soup between 8 large soup bowls. Top with croutons and garnish with peppers and onions. Squeeze a bit of lime juice over the bowls, to taste.

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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 10/22/17)

Spitzenburg Apples:

To store, keep apples as cold as possible in the refrigerator. To clean, gently rub the apple as you run warm water over it. Peel and cut your apple into slices or cubes. To prevent apples from browning for a longer time, brush with a lemon juice-water solution (1 cup water mixed with 1 teaspoon lemon juice). This dessert apple is great for cider, apple pies or eating out of hand. It is also rumored to have been a favorite of President Thomas Jefferson!

Carnival Squash:

Try roasting your halved carnival squash seasoned with a little butter and drizzle of maple syrup. It tastes nutty and sweeter than butternut squash but not as dry in texture as kabocha squash. Carnival squash is at its best when roasted which really brings out its flavor, but it can also be steamed or puréed. Roast and eat the seeds just like with other winter squashes. Its small, compact size makes it easy to cut through and is great for serving one or two people. Carnivals are also great to throw into stews, curries, soups, or even veggie chilis. Use them in any recipe calling for butternut or acorn squash.

 

Recipe: Carnival Squash with Apples and Thyme

Ingredients:

 

2 carnival or acorn squash

2 tablespoons melted butter or coconut oil

4 sprigs fresh thyme

4 Spitzenburg apples (Note: if subbing a larger tart apple, like Granny Smith, use 2 apples)

½ teaspoon cinnamon

2 tablespoons maple syrup or coconut sugar

 

Instructions:

  1. Heat the oven to 375°. Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Place on a cookie sheet and brush with a little of the butter and season with a little salt. Place a thyme sprig in each half and bake for 15 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, mix together the apples, the remaining melted butter, the sugar and the cinnamon.
  3. Remove the squash from the oven. Fill each squash with the apple mixture. Put them back in the oven for 15-20 minutes more, or until the squash and the apples are soft and caramelized.
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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 10/15/17)

Asian Pears:

Crunchy, juicy, and sweet. Try adding pears to a salad this week! Cut into wedges or cubes they would make a great addition to this week’s salad. For dressing, try mixing a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar with a little bit of Dijon mustard and about an eighth cup of maple syrup. Mix together with a wire whisk and beat in an eighth cup of olive or avocado oil. I would probably double the recipe if serving more than 3 people. Can also be topped with gorgonzola, feta, or goat cheese and pecans (or walnuts).

Parsnips:

Parsnips have an almost peppery sweet flavor to them that comes out nicely when roasted. They make a great addition/alternative to the more traditional baked or sautéed root vegetable.

Try these diced into bite size chunks or julienned, drizzled with olive oil and tossed in a bowl with a little salt and cayenne (or other spices). Bake on bottom rack at 450° for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until edges are browned and crispy.

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips, and Broccoli

Prep time: 20, Cook time: 40, Ready in 60 minutes. Serves 6.

Ingredients:

 

1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 medium carrots (about 3/4 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick circles

1 1/2 cups Broccoli cut into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces

4 cups potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

3 medium parsnips (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 cup sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), cut into 1 1/2-inch thick slices

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1 tablespoon dried rosemary

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

 

  1. Grease an 11 by 17-inch baking sheet pan with extra-virgin olive oil. Place vegetables in baking sheet and add the dried herbs, salt and pepper. Toss well, evenly coating all the vegetables with the seasonings and oil. Add more oil if the vegetables seem dry.

 

  1. Spread the vegetables evenly on a large baking sheet. Place on middle rack in oven and bake for 35 to 40 minutes.

 

Recipe adapted from: giadzy.com