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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 5/14/17)

Red Bell Peppers:

Red Peppers are a great way to add a bit of color to your food which is not only appealing to the eye but good for your eyes! Literally, they are packed with vitamin A, which is essential for good vision. These bright red veggies pair well with most savory dishes and can be added to soups, stir fries, salad, shish kabobs, or as a part of a veggie tray. They are also commonly used for stuffing because of their perfect cup shape. It’s best to eat your peppers right away, while still fresh. Don’t let them sit around too long as they lose their crunch and can become rubbery….bleh.

Mangos, Ataulfo:

Unlike other mangos, Ataulfos should be soft and slightly wrinkled when ripe. They change color from green to a beautiful rich yellow when they are at their sweetest. They also have a creamier texture and don’t get those annoying stringy fibers like other mangos do. Eat them raw or try adding them to one of your favorite cooked savory dishes. Fried rice with mango is simply amazing! Mangos also are great on salads, stir-fries, or added to sauces or in salsa. If you have a dehydrator they are so good dehydrated, or made into fruit leather. You can order a whole case and dehydrate them or freeze to use in smoothies.

Artichokes:

Artichokes can be steamed, boiled, baked or grilled. The recipe below gives instructions on boiling but they are also great when baked. To prepare, cut about an inch off the top and stem of the artichoke. Then cut it in half and remove the fuzzy part in the center with a spoon. Rub the cut side with a half a lemon, squeezing some juice into the fold and the middle. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper and freshly minced garlic. Bake on a cookie sheet for about 25 minutes at 425°. Melted butter or mayonnaise mixed with a little balsamic vinegar is commonly used for a dip but you can be creative and use whatever your taste buds desire!

Recipe: Steamed Artichoke with Lemony Aioli

Ingredients:

-2 artichokes, stems, and tips of leaves trimmed to remove any prickly edges

-1/2 cup light mayonnaise (preferably made with sunflower or avocado oil)

-1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

-1/2 teaspoon salt

-1/2 teaspoon pepper

-pinch of whole cloves (2-4)

-1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

-Water, for cooking

Directions:

1. In a large sauce pan (large enough to fit the artichokes side by side upright), bring about two-three inches of water to an aggressive simmer.

2. Cut the stem off each artichoke so it can sit upright on its own, and place the artichokes upright in the pan. Sprinkle the whole cloves over the top so that they settle among the artichoke leaves. Cover and let simmer for about 45 minutes until the leaves are tender. (Test by poking with a fork) Add more water as needed so that it doesn’t run dry and the artichoke doesn’t burn.

3. While the artichoke is cooking, whisk together the mayonnaise, lemon juice, salt, pepper and garlic powder.

4. Once cooked, remove the artichoke carefully with tongs into a platter (cover if not serving immediately), and serve with the aioli.

Recipe adapted from honeyandspiceblog.com

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Rustic Vegetables

 

INGREDIENTS:
 
– Assorted hard vegetables: KFF beets, carrots, red bell peppers, zucchini, KFF green beans, garlic, etc.
 
– 2 tablespoons Extra Virging Olive Oil
 
– Salt, pepper and dried dill to taste
 
PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 425. Cut vegetables into bit size pieces, leaving garlic whole. Toss vegetables in oil, salt, pepper and dried dill. Bake in a roasting pan for 20-25 minutes. I covered with foil for the first 15 minutes, then uncovered to let brown in the oven.
 
Recipe source: http://www.thecleaneatingmama.com/2011/06/rustic-vegetables.html
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Fresh This Week Tips – Feb 22, 2011

BABY BOK CHOY – As far as cabbages go, baby bok choy are pretty irresistible!

STORE: Place in a plastic bag — but do not close — and refrigerate for no more than three days.
PREP: There is no need to cook the stalks and leaves separately – just wash the whole and drain and cut into small pieces.
USE: Bok Choy is normally used in stir-fries. But when the time comes to start cooking, you’ll find that bok choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the bok choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of bok choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes.

RED BELL PEPPERS
STORE: Store peppers in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to five days.
PREP: Wash peppers just before using; remove the stem, seeds, and interior membranes, and add to salads, soups, or stir-fries.
USE: Peppers can be sautéed, steamed, or baked. Roast peppers by holding them over an open flame, or broiling them about 1/2-inch (1.25cm) from the broiler flame and rotating every minute or so until they blacken evenly. Put charred peppers in a plastic bag for about 10 minutes, then pull off the blackened peels and rinse the peppers under cold water. Pat dry, remove seeds and stems, and slice peppers. Use roasted pepper slices in salads, or purée in soups.

BUNCH CARROTS
STORE: Always remove tops from carrots as they take moisture from the “root” to stay green, leaving you with a limp carrot. Store carrots in the coolest part of the refrigerator in a plastic bag or wrapped in a paper towel to reduce the amount of moisture that is lost. They should keep for about two weeks. Be sure to store your carrots away from apples, pears, potatoes as they produce a gas that will make carrots bitter.
PREP:  Wash carrot roots and gently scrub them with a vegetable brush right before preparing them to eat. Peel (if desired) and chop according to your recipe or their purpose.
USE: You can steam, pickle, puree (for carrot soup!), juice, eat them raw or add them to any number of soups, stews and stir fries.

Do you hear what we hear? It is stir-fry time. See recipe: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chicken-Stir-Fry/Detail.aspx

Images from flickr.com