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How to Eat Your Box! (Week of 8/19/18)

Apples:
Apples are one of those quintessential healthy eating choices! You can dice them up and throw them into your hot cereal with some cinnamon for a fresh take on breakfast, toss them in smoothies, slice them atop green salads to sweeten them up and add texture, dip them in nut butter or yogurt for a snack, roast with savory fall veggies, bake with a topping of your favorite granola…so many ways to enjoy them! And perhaps the best part? Antioxidants and phytochemicals in apples have been linked to help prevent a number of chronic diseases, including: Alzheimer’s, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes and more. Store unwashed apples in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Be sure to store separately. See healthline.com for more nutrition information on Apples!

Green Beans:
Greens beans make a great side for dinner, especially if you sauté them in little olive oil and garlic. To cook more evenly blanch first by adding to a pot of boiling for 2 minutes. Then drain and put in ice water to stop the cooking process. Sauté garlic in olive oil and add green beans, sautéing until lightly seared. Add salt and pepper to taste. Green beans can also be easily baked in the oven like any other vegetable. Simply spread out evenly on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder, and toss to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes. Take out after about ten minutes and shake to turn. Sprinkle with some parmesan and serve.

Frisée

You’ve no doubt seen frisée before, perhaps without realizing it, tucked away inside a mesclun baby greens mix. Also called curly endive, the curly, pale green leaves are frizzy in appearance. Frisée is a variety of chicory, as you’ll be clued in to with the first solo bite: it’s one of those bitters we were talking about in last week’s newsletter. Store: in the fridge for up to five days (rinse first), in plastic or other non-breathable material, so it doesn’t wilt. Use: most often served fresh in salads, try it wilted or sautéed to mellow its bitterness. Frisée pairs well with flavor-packed ingredients and fats: Dress leaves with a warm vinaigrette of roast-chicken pan drippings and sherry or red wine vinegar, toss in browned bits of thick-cut pancetta, ham, or steak bits, or top with a poached or fried egg.

 

Featured Recipe: Farmer’s Market Salad

This dish combines all of those wonderful summer veggies with a creamy, yet light, dressing that is full of flavor. This version has cooked chicken, but this salad can certainly be served on its own. Likewise, feel free to swap in your favorite vegan dressing if dairy isn’t in your diet. Serves 3-4.

Ingredients:

2 medium (about 1 lb.) summer squashes (zucchini, yellow crookneck), sliced thin

1 bell pepper, sliced

2 cups tomatoes cut into 1-inch pieces

2 cups frisée, chopped

½ cup green onions, sliced

1 ear fresh corn, off the cob or 1 cup

6” length of cucumber, sliced

2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded or sliced, this would be 3/4 uncooked boneless chicken breast

DRESSING:

1/3 cup buttermilk

1/3 cup soy-free mayonnaise

1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt

¼ cup cilantro, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon lime juice

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

Instructions:

If you are starting with uncooked boneless chicken breast, preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Brush the chicken with olive oil on both sides and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish and roast for 15-20 minutes until cooked though. The internal temperature should be 165 degrees.

Let cool and either slice into thin strips or shred with a fork.

In a large bowl combine the summer squash, bell pepper, tomatoes, frisée, green onions, corn, cucumber, and shredded chicken.

In a small bowl combine the buttermilk, mayonnaise, Greek yogurt, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper.

Pour the dressing over the salad. Combine well. Serve at once.

 

Recipe adapted from anothertablespoon.com

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Savoring Summer

I am not going to be one of those people that starts lamenting the end of summer at the beginning of August, but I won’t lie – I’m feeling the end ticking nearer and nearer. Okay, so maybe I am one of those people, but rather than hosting a pity party and shedding tears that there weren’t enough tomatoes, days with sand in our toes, and sun on our faces, I’m going to do my best to soak up each day.

It’s probably no surprise that one of my favorite ways to savor the season is to eat of its bounty. So from here until the end of September, you will find me eating pounds and pounds of tomatoes, serving up slices of melon with a whisper of vanilla salt (just tried it last night for the first time and I’m never going back), picking blackberries off the wild vines, eating fresh peaches and letting their sweet juice drip down my arms and face.

We’ve had a pretty incredible summer this year and perhaps that’s why I’m already feeling a bit of sadness to see the days slip away so quickly, but what I’ve learned with seasons – any season in life – is that if you spend your time willing it to not pass, it won’t listen to you. I’d rather spend these days tucking away flavors and memories to recall when another season is upon us.

This recipe mingles all of my favorite flavors of summer into one bowl. It’s where sweet and savory collide into a flavorful salad filled with vinegar-spiked bread and a showering of fresh herbs. We really believe in the adage “What grows together, goes together” here, when peaches and tomatoes become fast friends. And it’s not just with this recipe—the next time you make the classic Caprese salad, try slipping in a few peach or nectarine slices there as well.

I hope that we all find the time to savor all that this season blesses us with. And may there be an endless supply of tomatoes and peaches until squash hits the basket.

Ashley Rodriguez

NotWithoutSalt.com

Award-winning food blogger

Author of Date Night In

 

 

Featured Recipe: Roasted Tomato and Peach Panzanella

SERVES 4

Ingredients:

1 pint / 280 g cherry tomatoes, divided

1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed

1⁄4 cup / 60 ml extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 cups / 85 g 1⁄2-inch bread cubes from a rustic loaf

2 garlic cloves, minced, divided

1 peach, diced

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1⁄2 teaspoon dried oregano

1 cup chopped assorted herbs (I used basil, dill, mint, and tarragon)

1 cup baby arugula

1⁄3 cup / 60 g goat cheese, crumbled

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Place half the pint of cherry tomatoes on the prepared sheet and toss with a generous pinch of salt and 1 tablespoon olive oil. Roast for 45 minutes, gently stirring halfway through the cooking process. Cut the remaining cherry tomatoes in half and set aside.

3. Place the cubes of bread on a second parchment-lined baking sheet and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil, a pinch of salt, and 1 minced garlic clove. Toast for 20 to 25 minutes, or until golden brown and completely crisp, stirring after 10 minutes. Remove and cool to room temperature.

4. In a large bowl, combine the roasted tomatoes, remaining minced garlic clove, diced peach, vinegar, oregano, 1⁄2 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil. Gently toss to combine and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

5. Finish the panzanella by adding the crisped and cooled bread cubes to the bowl, along with the herbs, unroasted tomatoes, and arugula. Toss well and let sit for 10 minutes so that the juices start to soften the bread, still leaving a crunch. If you prefer the bread a bit softer, you can let it sit for longer.

6. Finish with crumbled goat cheese and serve.

 

Know Your Produce: Summer Stonefruit Care

Stonefruit’s (peaches, nectarines, pluots, etc.) biggest enemy while ripening is moisture, coupled with lack of airflow. Set ripening stonefruit on a cloth or paper-covered counter top or in a place where it gets plenty of airflow. Try setting them stem side down to ripen, which lessens the chance of them rolling and bruising.

To test for ripeness, gently press around stem – when flesh gives slightly to pressure fruit is ripe. Never squeeze the sides of the fruit, as even a small bruise will be cause enough to turn into a rot/bruised spot on your fruit as it is still ripening. Stonefruit ripens from the inside to the outside, so if fruit is soft all over it is most likely overripe.

Once your stonefruit is ripe, it deteriorates very quickly. Within a day of being fully ripe, if left out of refrigeration, you can have overripe/spoiled fruit and some very attracted fruit flies. Check daily and place in refrigerator as soon as you notice the stem area has begun to soften. Once refrigerated, plan to use within a day or two.

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A Summer List

So you have a summer list? You know, the thing you write at the beginning of summer when everything feels possible. For the past several years we’ve had a summer to-do list only to come to the start of a new school year and find all the things we didn’t cross off. Suddenly our wonderful and full summer felt unsuccessful because we didn’t cross things off our list.

Even with those silly end-of-summer disappointments brought on by the list I still have a summer list for this year.  But this list is different. It’s just enough so that if a day has no plans we can turn to it for inspiration but it’s loose enough that we will have no problem crossing off its items. Like picnics on the beach, read a good book and eat cherries by the handful.

We can cross off that last one a dozen times already as June’s massive heat has brought our prized cherries earlier than usual this year. More often than not our cherries never make it into anything except our mouths and I imagine you’re much the same. But I still wanted you to be tempted by this recipe because it uses the sweetness of cherries to balance a tart and savory salad that goes beautifully with anything you may be pulling off the grill this summer.

Pomegranate molasses adds an exotic tanginess that is makes it worth seeking out this ingredient but if you’d rather put time into crossing something off your summer list than seek this out then you can leave it out and add a bit more lemon and a touch of honey in its place.

Whether you are making a list or not I hope your summer days are filled with handfuls of cold cherries and leisurely picnics. Hopefully with this salad included.

ashley rodriguez

Photo property of Not Without Salt. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

 

Couscous Salad with Fresh Cherries

Serves 6-8 as a side.

Ingredients

 

3 cups Israeli couscous

1/4 cup pomegranate molasses

2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

1/3 cup olive oil

Juice from 1/2 a lemon

1 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground black pepper

2 cups cherries, pitted and quartered

1 cup (4 ounces) marcona almonds

1/2 red onion, diced

1 1/2 cups, packed fresh parsley and mint leaves

1/2 cup crumbled feta

 

Directions

  1. Cook the couscous in boiling water that is seasoned with salt and a glug of olive oil. Drain the couscous while it’s still al dente, about 7-9 minutes but each variety is different so continually check the doneness.
  2. Rinse the couscous with cold water to stop the cooking then set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl whisk together the pomegranate molasses, rice wine vinegar, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Add this to the couscous.
  4. Mix in the cherries, almonds and onion.
  5. Finely mince the fresh herbs and add those to the salad. Finish with fresh feta.
  6. Taste and adjust to your liking, adding more salt or lemon juice if needed.

Ashley Rodriguez

Chef, Mom, Creator of Not Without Salt, Author of Date Night In 

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A Salad of Nectarines and Asparagus

A SALAD OF NECTARINES AND ASPARAGUS

4 servings

Ingredients:

1 small bunch asparagus, sliced on the bias

1 teaspoon oil

Zest of one lemon, reserve 1/2 lemon for juice

1 clove garlic, minced

Pinch red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon Balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon minced shallot

3 tablespoons olive oil

5-6 cups mixed greens, such as lettuces, spinach leaves, young kale, arugula

2 nectarines, thinly sliced lengthwise

2-3 ounces Feta or Chèvre, crumbled

1/4 cup chopped, toasted almonds Sea salt and pepper to taste

Parsley for garnish, optional

Directions:

1. In a large skillet over medium heat, sauté the asparagus in one teaspoon oil, stirring occasionally, for about four minutes, until bright green. Add garlic, lemon zest, and red pepper flakes and cook for one minute more. Turn off heat and finish with a squeeze of juice from half the lemon, and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

2. Make the dressing by whisking together the Balsamic vinegar with the shallot. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil and whisk vigorously until emulsified. Add salt and pepper to taste.

3. In a large salad bowl, toss the greens with the dressing. Top with the asparagus, Feta, chopped almonds and finish with slices of nectarine. Garnish with parsley if desired. Best served immediately. Recipe adapted from: theyearinfood.com

Know Your Produce: NECTARINES

Nectarines closely related fruit species to peach. Juicy, delicious nectarines are low in calories (100 g just provide 44 calories), and contain no saturated fats. They are packed with numerous health promoting anti-oxidants, plant nutrients, minerals and vitamins. Store: Although best enjoyed without delay, ripe nectarines can be refrigerated for three to five days. Leave firmer ones at room temperature to ripen. Stone fruit ripens from the inside out: check the stem area to see if it yields to gentle pressure. Ripe nectarines are also usually fragrant. Prep: Wash well under cool water before using. Use: Nectarines may be enjoyed, peel and all. They are delicious sliced and eaten out of hand, or with your breakfast cereal/on yogurt. They also work well in almost any recipe calling for peaches.

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Red D’Anjou Pear and Broccoli Salad

Red D’Anjou Pear and Broccoli Salad

 

Ingredients

 

For the dressing:

½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

½ teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

pinch kosher salt

 

For the salad:

2 cups broccoli, cut into bite-sized pieces (about 1 bunch)

¼ cup red onion, diced

½ cup walnuts or cashews

1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 to 2 ripe d’Anjou pears, cut into thin slices (about 1¾ cup after slicing)

Crumbled Roquefort, blue or gorgonzola cheese for serving, bacon bits

 

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Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil (like you would for cooking pasta).
  2. Dump your broccoli in the boiling water and cook for about 15 seconds. You want bright green broccoli, without loosing the crunch. Drain and rinse broccoli under cool water to stop the cooking process.

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3. In a small container or jar, whisk or shake lemon juice and honey to combine until honey is completely dissolved. Whisk in cider vinegar, olive oil and salt, until completely blended.

4. In your serving bowl, place all the salad ingredients (broccoli, onion, walnuts, yellow bell pepper, and pears). Pour the dressing over and gently toss to coat.

5.  Crumble blue or gorgonzola cheese, and/or bacon bits on top.

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Serve and enjoy!

 

Recipe created by Marty, for the Klesick Family Farm

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Raw Beet Salad

Ingredients

1 to 1½ pounds beets, preferably small

1 yellow onion or 2 large shallots

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard, or to taste

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons sherry or other good strong vinegar

1 sprig fresh tarragon, minced, if available

1/4 cup chopped parsley leaves

 

Instructions

  • Peel the beets and onions/shallots. Combine them in a food processor and pulse carefully until the beets are shredded; do not purée. (Or grate the beets by hand and mince the onion/shallots, then combine.) Scrape into a bowl.
  • Toss with the salt, pepper, mustard, oil and vinegar. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Toss in the herbs and serve.

 

Variations

  1. Raw Beet Salad with Carrot and Ginger. Ginger and beets are killer together. Use equal parts beet and carrot, about 8 ounces of each. Treat the carrots as you do the beets (you can process them together), adding about a tablespoon of minced peeled ginger to the mix; omit the tarragon. Substitute peanut for olive oil, lime juice for sherry vinegar, and cilantro for the parsley.
  2. Raw Beet Salad with Yogurt Dressing. Replace the olive oil and one of the tablespoons of vinegar with 2 tablespoons plain yogurt, preferably whole-milk or low-fat.

Recipe adapted from http://markbittman.com/recipe/raw-beet-salad/

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The Recipe Box: Chopped Kale Salad + Creamy Almond Ginger Dressing

salad_kale chopped2_edibleperspective.com_used by permission

This week’s recipe box features the ingredients for a recipe from Ashley McLaughlin, the person behind the inspiring blog over at Edible Perspective. I was looking for a recipe to feature the local kale we’d be getting in this week from our friends over at Ralph’s Greenhouses, and came across this one for a chopped kale salad paired with a creamy dressing – a fresh change up from the usual steamed or sautéed kale recipes.

Ashley’s salad starts out with the simple step of steaming and blanching asparagus, and then incorporates a healthy variety of textures and flavors in the form of more finely chopped (mostly raw) veggies. She then tops it all off with protein-rich quinoa and chickpeas, a creamy almond dressing infused with ginger, and finally some marinated Portabella mushrooms. Add a sprinkling of sesame seeds if you will. This is a very filling and satisfying weeknight meal. You can find the full recipe on her blog.

 

The Recipe BoxWe’ll plan, pack, and deliver…you cook and enjoy!

This box contains a recipe and all of the ingredients you will need for assembling a healthy meal for 4 people plus some additional fruit to enjoy.

This week’s featured recipe: Chopped Kale Salad + Creamy Almond Ginger Dressing

Chopped kale & cabbage covered in a creamy dressing (we’ve included directions for an almond dressing), and topped with marinated portabella mushrooms, more veggies, and chick peas. Trust us, it’s delish! Order your Recipe Box here.

Happy salad fixing!

Marty, for the Klesick Family Farm

 

Photos: Copyright © 2013, [Edible Perspective]. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

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A Salad of Nectarines and Asparagus

4 servings

Ingredients:

1 small bunch asparagus, sliced on the bias

1 teaspoon oil

Zest of one lemon, reserve 1/2 lemon for juice

1 clove garlic, minced

Pinch red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon Balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon minced shallot

3 tablespoons olive oil

5-6 cups mixed greens, such as lettuces, spinach leaves, young kale, arugula

2 nectarines, thinly sliced lengthwise

2-3 ounces Feta or Chèvre, crumbled

1/4 cup chopped, toasted almonds

Sea salt and pepper to taste

Parsley for garnish, optional

 

Directions:

1.            In a large skillet over medium heat, sauté the asparagus in one teaspoon oil, stirring occasionally, for about four minutes, until bright green. Add garlic, lemon zest, and red pepper flakes and cook for one minute more. Turn off heat and finish with a squeeze of juice from half the lemon, and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

2.            Make the dressing by whisking together the Balsamic vinegar with the shallot. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil and whisk vigorously until emulsified. Add salt and pepper to taste.

3.            In a large salad bowl, toss the greens with the dressing. Top with the asparagus, Feta, chopped almonds and finish with slices of nectarine. Garnish with parsley if desired. Best when  served immediately.

Recipe adapted from theyearinfood.com

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Butternut Squash, Lentil and Quinoa Salad

INGREDIENTS
1/2 butternut squash, peeled & deseeded
3-4 garlic cloves, skin on
1/2 fresh chili, sliced
1/2 cup quinoa
1 cup boiling water
400 grams/14 ounces cooked lentils
1 teaspoon cumin powder
Olive oil
Juice from 1/2 lemon
Salt to taste
Fresh coriander/cilantro leaves for garnish
 
 
PREPARATION
Preheat oven to 180 degrees C / 356 degrees F. Peel and deseed 1/2 a butternut squash. Dice into 2.5cm (1-inch) cubes and place them on parchment-paper-lined baking tray as well as garlic cloves and chili. Drizzle over some olive oil, cumin powder and salt and toss all the ingredients until well combined. Then bake them in the preheated oven for 40 minutes or until the squash feels tender and fluffy when pricked with a fork. 
 
While the squash is roasting in the oven, pour 1/2 cup of quinoa and 1 cup of hot boiling water in a medium-sized pot. Start cooking over medium-high flame until it starts to boil. Then let it simmer by reducing to low-medium flame and cover with a lid. In the meantime, rinse and drain the lentils. Set aside. For the quinoa, cook until the water is ALMOST absorbed. When there’s just a little water left at the bottom of the pot (I’ll say about 2 tablespoons worth of water left), turn off the flame and leave the lid on. This will allow the quinoa to completely absorb the water without sticking to the pot. Fork through the quinoa so that it’s light and fluffy. Set aside.
 
Add lentils to the quinoa and toss gently until well combined. Season lightly with salt. Add roasted butternut squash, garlic (skin-off and thinly chopped) and chili to the lentil-quinoa mixture. Drizzle some olive oil and lemon juice over the salad and toss to mix. Just before serving, garnish with some coriander/cilantro leaves. You can serve this salad warm or cold.
 
Photo and Recipe Courtesy of Fuss Free Cooking
 

 

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Know Your Produce – Kohlrabi

Have you ever eaten a kohlrabi? These little sputnik-shaped vegetables come in green or purple, can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. The word kohlrabi is German for cabbage turnip (kohl as in cole-slaw, and rübe for turnip), though kohlrabi is more related to cabbage and cauliflower than to root vegetables. We usually eat them raw, just peeled, sliced and added to a salad, but they are also delicious cooked and are often used in Indian cuisine.

If the kohlrabi leaves are still attached to the bulb, trim the  m and store separately. If the leaves are in good shape—firm and green—they can be cooked but will need to be used within a couple of days. The bulbs should be stored, unwashed, in a plastic bag. They will hold for about a week in the refrigerator.

Simple preparation: Tender, young kohlrabi is delicious eaten raw. Peel the outer skin with a paring knife. Slice, dice, or grate, and add to salads. Use on raw vegetable platters or serve with a creamy dip. Substitute in recipes calling for radishes. Grated kohlrabi can be added to slaw, but lightly salt it first and let stand for several minutes. Squeeze to remove any excess water before adding dressi  ng. Kohlrabi can also be steamed or boiled. For this preparation don’t peel until after they are cooked. Steam or boil until bulbs are tender, peel skin, and season with butter, salt, and pepper, a cheese sauce, or just enjoy plain.

If the leaves attached to the kohlrabi bulb are fresh and green, they can be enjoyed as a cooked green. Wash the leaves and remove the ribs. Blanch in boiling water until just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain and squeeze excess water from leaves. Chop leaves, then sauté in a little olive oil or butter. Season with salt and pepper. Add a splash of vinegar or squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

From www.care2.com/greenliving/how-to-use-kohlrabi